Sorry, New York, but the Sun Is Shining on Los Angeles' Sports Teams

By Bonsignore, Vincent | Pasadena Star-News, June 4, 2014 | Go to article overview

Sorry, New York, but the Sun Is Shining on Los Angeles' Sports Teams


Bonsignore, Vincent, Pasadena Star-News


I'm not going to lie. As a native New Yorker, I was rooting hard for a Kings vs. Rangers Stanley Cup Final.

Sorry rest of America, but there's nothing quite like the two greatest cities in the country getting together to decide the championship for one of the four major sports.

I'm an NBA guy through and through, and while a weekend in South Beach is as good as it gets, good luck selling me on the San Antonio end of the Heat-Spurs NBA Finals.

New York vs. Los Angeles, on the other hand, has everything you want.

It's glamour and glitz and star power.

It's Hollywood vs. Wall Street. Malibu vs. Broadway.

It's Staples Center vs. Madison Square Garden. Sunset Boulevard vs. Times Square.

Does it get any better?

Nope.

Thing is, as I sat down to extoll the virtues of the two biggest sports stages in the world, it hit me like a Nolan Ryan fastball to the ribs just how far New York has fallen behind L.A. when it comes to our sports teams.

It's almost embarrassing how bad things are in my hometown, especially when you consider how good things are in Los Angeles.

Even with the Lakers struggling in a rebuilding phase, the L.A. sports buffet offers a bunch of other delicious dishes to delight our palate.

With Yasiel Puig, the Dodgers can create magic on any given night.

Chris Paul and Blake Griffin are a dynamic duo for the Clippers.

Mike Trout is a highlight show waiting to happen.

Brett Hundley is a Heisman Trophy candidate at UCLA.

And the Kings are that nerve-racking cliffhanger you can't stop watching.

Did I mention California Chrome will be looking to make history on your turf this weekend?

It's a 24/7 sports smorgasbord.

The Dodgers will draw more than three million fans this year - again - the Angels will exceed two million.

The Lakers play in front of superstars and the Clippers sell out every night.

And we don't come out just to mingle.

Our teams are damn good.

On top of the weather and beaches and mountains and all that eye candy we enjoy every day, our sports nights are filled with star power and entertainment and winning.

Lots and lots of winning.

New York, not so much.

The Big Apple has gone sour all of a sudden.

Aside from the Rangers - who are making just their second trip to the Stanley Cup Final over the past 20 years - what exactly does New York have going for it?

From baseball to basketball to football, these are sad times in Gotham.

I've been a Mets fan my whole life, but is there a more boring team in baseball?

Quick, turn off your smartphone and tell me who plays first base for the Mets.

Give up?

What about shortstop?

Or right field?

I guarantee you every single New York baseball fan knows Adrian Gonzalez, Hanley Ramirez and Puig man those positions for the Dodgers. …

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