As College Presidents Earn Big Bucks, Students Pay More and Get Less

By Marjorie Elizabeth Wood; Andrew Erwi | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA), June 5, 2014 | Go to article overview

As College Presidents Earn Big Bucks, Students Pay More and Get Less


Marjorie Elizabeth Wood; Andrew Erwi, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)


Each spring, as college graduates collect their diplomas and their first student loan payment slips, the Chronicle of Higher Education publishes its list of public university presidents collecting the biggest paychecks. Median salaries were up 5 percent for the 2013 fiscal year. Nine presidents took home more than $1 million.

Why should students and faculty - and everyone who cares about them - pay close attention to the upward spiral of such salaries? Because according to our research, these highest-paid presidents are more likely to preside over public universities where student debt is growing fastest and the number of full-time faculty is shrinking.

In our analysis, published by the Institute for Policy Studies, we asked a simple question: How are the highest-paid presidents doing when it comes to addressing the crises of rising student debt and part-time, or temporary, faculty labor?

Not well. From 2005 to 2012, average student debt at the 25 state schools with the highest-paid presidents rose 13 percent faster than the national average at four-year public universities. Permanent faculty - 54 percent of total faculty in 2005 - fell to just 48 percent by 2011. The number of part-time and temporary faculty members at these schools rose 29 percent faster than the national average for all universities, including community colleges.

The effects of crushing student debt are well known. But the decline of permanent faculty may hurt students even more by reducing the quality of their education.

In a recent survey, 98 percent of part-time faculty said they were "missing opportunities to better serve their students because of the demands of their schedule." The majority were teaching at more than one school. Some taught as many as 10 courses per semester. Temporary faculty, even if working full time, move on quickly when their contracts end. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

As College Presidents Earn Big Bucks, Students Pay More and Get Less
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.