Mike Myers' 'Supermensch: The Legend of Shep Gordon' Was Created by a Crazy, Life-Changing Moment

By Lowman, Rob | Daily News (Los Angeles, CA), June 5, 2014 | Go to article overview

Mike Myers' 'Supermensch: The Legend of Shep Gordon' Was Created by a Crazy, Life-Changing Moment


Lowman, Rob, Daily News (Los Angeles, CA)


Everyone has a crazy story about a life-changing moment. None is crazier than Shep Gordon's.

A Long Island native who went to the State University of New York at Buffalo, he moved to Los Angeles for a job as a probation officer in 1968. As a long-haired hippie working in the correctional system, he lasted one day.

Here's where the story gets fuzzy.

In "Supermensch: The Legend of Shep Gordon," the documentary that is the directorial debut of Mike Myers, he remembers almost immediately after leaving his job checking into the Landmark Hotel in Hollywood. Having talked to people since then, Gordon thinks he might have misremembered: "I have been piecing it together. Chronologically, it probably happened over a month or six weeks."

Either way, Gordon finds himself at the Landmark (now the Highland Gardens Hotel) getting high in his room one night when he hears a woman scream by the pool. Thinking she's in trouble, he tries to pull the guy she's with away from her. She punches him.

The next day he runs into the couple at the pool. She's Janis Joplin. He's Jimi Hendrix. They become friends. The legendary guitarist eventually suggests that Gordon, who was dealing drugs to make a living, become a manager of a rock band and introduced him to Alice Cooper.

"I didn't even know what a manager was," says Gordon, who adds he wasn't even into music that much. More than 45 years later, he is still managing Cooper, and along the way built an empire, managing musical acts like Teddy Pendergrass, Luther Vandross and Anne Murray, producing films like "Kiss of the Spider Woman" and creating the celebrity chef craze. (Somebody had to.) Then there was an extravagant playboy lifestyle of cars and mansions and supermodels.

Today, the semiretired Gordon, with good friend Cooper his only client, lives a much quieter life on Maui. A Buddhist and devotee of the Dalai Lama, he likes to practice the culinary skills. Over the years, he managed Emeril Lagasse, Wolfgang Puck and Roger Verge.

While they were food celebrities, the chefs were underpaid until Gordon began to figure out how to market them. "Get the money" was his mantra when it came to his clients.

The superagent says he turned down Myers when the actor-writer first brought up the idea of the documentary. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Mike Myers' 'Supermensch: The Legend of Shep Gordon' Was Created by a Crazy, Life-Changing Moment
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.