Scorecard Ranks New Jersey 3rd in Strength of Its Gun Laws

By Jackson, Herb | The Record (Bergen County, NJ), December 10, 2013 | Go to article overview

Scorecard Ranks New Jersey 3rd in Strength of Its Gun Laws


Jackson, Herb, The Record (Bergen County, NJ)


New Jersey has the third-toughest gun control laws in the country, and has joined 20 other states in adding to them since the deadly shootings in Newtown, Conn., nearly a year ago.

"In the time since Newtown, there's been a huge public outcry for change on this issue," said Robyn Thomas, executive director of the Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence, which, with the Brady Campaign, issued a scorecard ranking state laws Monday.

New Jersey had 5.2 gun deaths per 100,000 people in 2010, the fifth-lowest rate in the country. On a scorecard that looked at the strength of laws allowing background checks and carrying concealed weapons, among other things, New Jersey ranked behind Connecticut and California.

New laws in New Jersey included improving the state and federal coordination of mental health records and barring people on terrorism watch lists from buying guns.

Governor Christie rejected bills that would have centralized ammunition and gun-purchase records, required more firearms training and banned .50-caliber guns.

"He did sign some bills that are very positive and we're happy to see that, but he really could have gone much further, and he should have," said Laura Cutilletta, an attorney for the law center. …

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