New in Kids' Series Fiction: Dogs, Sleuthing, Heroics

By Cariens, Carol | Evansville Courier & Press (2007-Current), July 22, 2012 | Go to article overview

New in Kids' Series Fiction: Dogs, Sleuthing, Heroics


Cariens, Carol, Evansville Courier & Press (2007-Current)


Seriously. Let's get serious about series. We love' em, don't we? It's a happy day indeed when the newest volume in our favorite series is ready for us at the library. Kids are no different, you know. They love series fiction, too. In fact, children's book series are big business.

Think "Harry Potter." Think "Percy Jackson and the Olympians." Think "The Hunger Games." Think "The 39 Clues." And on and on and on. There are some other children's series out there - not mega- blockbusters, mind you - but good reads that kids (and their parents, too) might like to try. Here are two examples

John Grisham's legal thrillers are popular and now Grisham is venturing into the lucrative tween audience with his "Theodore Boone, Kid Lawyer" series.

Theo is the child of lawyers. He's bright, he knows a lot about the mechanics of the legal system - and he's only 13.

Sometimes knowing too much can get a person into big trouble, and Theo finds that out only too well in his first adventure.

I like the relationship between Theo and his parents. It's still parents and child, but they respect his knowledge and allow him to help his friends with problems while providing definite parameters of what he can and can't do. Good for them.

Follow Theo through three published books (so far). You won't be surprised to know that adults are reading these just as much as kids.

Everybody loves a good dog story so who could resist the "J. J. Tully Mysteries" by veteran children's author Doreen Cronin?

J. J. is a retired searchand-rescue dog living out his leisure years on the farm of his trainer, Barb.

Life of leisure? Not quite. In "The Trouble with Chickens," J. J. is hired by Millicent, the mother hen, to track down her missing chicks.

J. J.' s pay for this bucolic rescue? One cheeseburger. Well done.

With tongue-in-cheek humor and a nod toward film noir's hard- boiled gumshoes, J. J. meets Vince the Funnel, who just might know more than he is telling about the missing poultry. Vince the Funnel? You have to see illustrator Kevin Cornell's artwork for yourself. This featherbrained comedy is for anyone. Don't miss "The Legend of Diamond Lil," starring J. J.' s new neighbor, a beautiful Samoyed. Millicent and her chicks as well as Vince the Funnel are back for more doggone fun, too.

Here are some updates about other favorite series

"Fancy Nancy," the brainchild of Jane O'Connor, is growing up. Long a favorite with the picture book and easy-reader set, Nancy Clancy is now starring in her own chapter book series, "Nancy Clancy, Super Sleuth."

In Book One of the series, Nancy and her bejeweled magnifying glass are on the case when a teacher's prized possession goes missing. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

New in Kids' Series Fiction: Dogs, Sleuthing, Heroics
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.