Wassmer Survives Rough Day ; 9-Time Champ Holds Lead at 'Bizarre' City

By Ford, Steve | Evansville Courier & Press (2007-Current), August 12, 2012 | Go to article overview

Wassmer Survives Rough Day ; 9-Time Champ Holds Lead at 'Bizarre' City


Ford, Steve, Evansville Courier & Press (2007-Current)


NEWBURGH, Ind. - The superb condition of Rolling Hills Country Club in superb weather conditions should've been bad news for par Saturday in the third round of the Evansville Courier & Press Men's City Golf Tournament. Par must have missed the memo, though, and used a combination of tough rough and lighting-fast greens to vex every player in the field except one.

Only Kevin Wassmer, the record-tying nine-time champion who hasn't won since 2006, matched par 72 at Rolling Hills and the result was a two-shot lead over Nick Frazer, the runner-up last year, and a four-shot cushion over 2009 champion Brad Niemann.

Those three had started the day tied for the lead and played in the last group Saturday, but Frazer birdied the last hole to shoot 2-over 74 while Niemann played in 76 strokes.

That changed the leaderboard but not the final pairing as Wassmer (205), Frazer (207) and Niemann (209) will go off the scenic first tee at Evansville Country Club last today at 10 a.m.

The 9:50 a.m. group includes 2010 champion Matt Hancock at 210, Sean Stone (212) and Joe Goelzhauser (214).

"Being in the lead is always good," said Wassmer, who remains 8- under for the tournament. "But I have my work cut out for me (today). I'm going to have to play well."

Wassmer had a chance to run off and hide Saturday when he shook off four wayward tee shots into the trees over the first five holes that weren't par 3s and still managed to remain even par through eight holes.

Niemann, who also started the day at 8-under, vaulted briefly into the lead with a chip-in birdie at No. …

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