Time to Lift Pointless Cuban Travel Ban

By Mcfeatters, Dale | Evansville Courier & Press (2007-Current), April 14, 2013 | Go to article overview

Time to Lift Pointless Cuban Travel Ban


Mcfeatters, Dale, Evansville Courier & Press (2007-Current)


If Cuba's communist regime can't be destroyed by a singer with a frenetic stage presence and an association with the term "Bootylicious" and a rapper who once shot his older brother and did an album called "American Gangster," it's probably impervious to change from the exceptional American entertainer, let alone the average American. Heaven knows, we've tried everything else for the last 53 years, perhaps even exceeding Albert Einstein's definition of insanity, of doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results.

Beyonc Knowles and her husband, rapper/businessman/clothing designer Jay-Z, have just returned from five days in Cuba playing tourist on what was clearly a vacation. And that's illegal for everyday Americans not of Cuban descent.

The more heated members of the Cuban-American delegation in Congress wanted the couple met at the airport and frog-marched off to custody for violating U.S. laws on trade and travel to Cuba - those are the aforementioned laws with a half-century of proven failure - laws apparently drawn up by Franz Kafka and George Orwell after a heavy night of drinking Cuba Libres.

Traveling to Cuba is forbidden for most Americans. Thanks to the Cuban-American lobby, it's the only country that is. The thinking is that the presence of American celebrities confers legitimacy on the regime and provides it much-needed cash to oppress its people, even though this is rather undermined by the fact that Canadians, Europeans and Latin Americans come and go freely.

Dennis Rodman went to North Korea, a country infinitely crazier and more dangerous than Cuba, and everybody, including the U.S. government, treated it as a great lark, even though his host, Kim Jong Un, might be certifiably nuts.

Americans need a license to travel to Cuba. …

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