Fairy Tales Are Not Always Just for Children. These Books Prove That

By Hague, Courtney | Evansville Courier & Press (2007-Current), June 23, 2013 | Go to article overview

Fairy Tales Are Not Always Just for Children. These Books Prove That


Hague, Courtney, Evansville Courier & Press (2007-Current)


Do you have a favorite fairy tale? One you remember from childhood? These traditional stories are not always as innocent and happy as you remember, and they are not just for children. Young Adult books expertly take on the task of retelling and reimaging fairy tales.

Perhaps the best-known is Cinderella. But have you ever imagined Cinderella in the future? In "Cinder" by Marissa Meyer, the reader is taken to New Beijing in the not-too-distant future. Here we meet Cinder, a young woman whose leg, arm and some other body parts have been replaced by robotic pieces after a horrific accident in her childhood. She is a cyborg and is technically the property of her "stepmother." This novel loosely follows the Cinderella narrative with stepsisters, a prince, and a ball. But there are also complications, like a plague and an evil Lunar queen. The sequel, "Scarlet," is loosely based on Little Red Riding Hood and the third book, "Cress," will be a retelling of Rapunzel.

For something more historical, try "A Curse Dark As Gold" by Elizabeth C. Bunce, a retelling of Rumpelstiltskin set during the industrial revolution. Charlotte Miller's father, the owner of the Stirwaters Mill, has died, leaving no heir and a mill in shambles. Charlotte refuses to let the mill be sold or the town to die out. Though the book starts off slowly and reads like historical fiction, soon odd happenings around the mill begin to feel less like coincidence and more like the curse to which the villagers always refer. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Fairy Tales Are Not Always Just for Children. These Books Prove That
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.