Stormy Hurricane Weather Channel ; Coverage Can Adopt Hysterical Tone, Critics Say

By Semuels, Alana | Evansville Courier & Press (2007-Current), July 12, 2013 | Go to article overview

Stormy Hurricane Weather Channel ; Coverage Can Adopt Hysterical Tone, Critics Say


Semuels, Alana, Evansville Courier & Press (2007-Current)


BREEZY POINT, N. Y. - The sky is cloudless and blue in this coastal community of bungalows by the sea. But Stephanie Abrams has disaster on her mind. A meteorologist with the Weather Channel, Abrams is here to co-host the network's morning shows to kick off the start of hurricane season. Her employer is predicting more storms than usual this year. Abrams has come to this town, which was walloped by Hurricane Sandy last year, to warn viewers of potential dangers in the months ahead.

"It only takes one - one Sandy or Katrina - in order for the entire U.S. or the entire world to feel that hurt and pain," she said, looking into the camera.

Seconds later, viewers watching the show live on TV saw a scary graphic of a gazebo battered by wind and rain. The station proclaimed itself Hurricane Central.

Bad weather is good business for the Weather Channel.

Helped by a steady string of blizzards, tropical storms, hurricanes and tornadoes, the cable channel has increased its revenue while some other media outlets have struggled.

Even when the weather in most of the country is mild, the channel's roundthe-clock coverage tends to be heavy with big graphics, capital letters and warnings of what bad weather could be unfolding somewhere, soon, in the United States.

Such weather data are now expanding to the Web and cellphones, part of the reason the company changed its name to the Weather Co. from the Weather Channel late last year.

But as storms get fiercer and more frequent, the Weather Channel has come under fire for covering them in a way that seems more entertainment than information.

It decided last year to start giving names to winter storms, a unilateral move that drew ire from meteorologists and the National Weather Service, which is responsible for naming hurricanes.

Its coverage of "Nemo," the snowstorm that blanketed much of the East Coast in February, featured all-caps headlines such as "YOU MUST PREPARE NOW," links that allowed people to warn their friends that bad weather was coming, and graphics of snow and wind that more aptly depicted the Ice Age than a snowstorm.

The gossip site Gawker poked fun at the breathless coverage in an article with the headline "Snow Panic Has Driven Weather.com Completely Insane."

Still, big storms are catnip for advertisers. The fourth quarter of 2012, which included Sandy and some other big winter storms, was a blockbuster, said Curt Hecht, chief global revenue offi-cer for Weather Co., which is privately held. Weather.com had more page views on the first day of Sandy than NBC.com had for all of the London Olympics, he said.

"It's hard to say, 'Boy, we made a lot of money'... when people have lost their homes," Hecht said. "But the reality is Sandy, from a hurricane perspective, was our largest ad monetization event."

The week of Hurricane Sandy, it averaged 780,000 viewers in the heavily viewed 6 to 10 a.m. time slot, more than double the previous week, according to the ad firm Horizon Media.

To keep up with viewer demand for big weather events, the company has added two experts to its severe-weather team over the last year. Technology allows it to air more and more footage from big storms across the U.S. and around the world.

It also has beefed up its website, which now has 1.5 billion monthly page views, with feature stories and photo galleries that are only tangentially weather-related ("Before the Bikini: Rare Vintage Beach Photos").

NBC joined two private equity firms to buy the Weather Channel in 2008, and since then weather shows have increasingly featured cross- promotions with other NBC properties, including segments from CNBC. The Weather Channel started airing more reality shows and television programs such as "Deadliest Space Weather" and "Forecasting the End," running 11 series in 2012 and launching 15 this year.

"Forecasting the End," according to promotional materials, is about how "catastrophic weather or natural disasters could possibly cause the end of days. …

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