Address the Many Societal Costs Incurred by Behavior of Bullying ; YOUTH RESOURCES

By Reeves, Natalie | Evansville Courier & Press (2007-Current), December 31, 2013 | Go to article overview

Address the Many Societal Costs Incurred by Behavior of Bullying ; YOUTH RESOURCES


Reeves, Natalie, Evansville Courier & Press (2007-Current)


Bullying is one of those topics that seem to be discussed quite often. The statistics on bullying are quite shocking and there are multiple ways schools are dealing with this epidemic, but sadly it continues in and out of school. I was bullied by a boy when I was in the first grade. Bullied as in being chased around the playground, pushed down, tripped, hair pulling, punches thrown, you get the idea. On top of that, and even through all of my school years, I endured the name calling and teasing for being a "nerd." Yes that was quite a while ago, but the sad thing is it still goes on today and many people do not know what to do to stop it; some do know what to do and choose not to; or some just throw out the excuse of, "Oh, they're just kids being kids."

Bullying doesn't just affect those who are bullied. There are astounding statistics about those who do the bullying, those who see it, and obviously those who are bullied. Here are some facts from www.stopbullying.gov

Kids who are bullied are more likely to experience depression, sadness, anxiety, change in normal patterns such as sleeping and eating, and loss of interest in many activities.

Kids who bully others are at a higher risk to abuse alcohol and drugs later in life, more likely to drop out of school, get into fights, be convicted of crimes later and be abusive to partners and children in their future.

Kids who witness bullying as bystanders are more likely to use tobacco, alcohol and other drugs, miss or skip school, and are at an increased risk of mental health problems. …

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