Pension Groups Gave Illinois Justices $3 Million in Campaign Contributions

By The | Evansville Courier & Press (2007-Current), January 3, 2014 | Go to article overview

Pension Groups Gave Illinois Justices $3 Million in Campaign Contributions


The, Evansville Courier & Press (2007-Current)


Justices of the Illinois Supreme Court, the potential arbiters of Illinois' pension-reform law, have collected nearly $3 million in campaign contributions during the past 13 years from groups that support both sides of the issue, according to a published report. The Chicago Sun-Times reported most of the money was collected by one justice, Thomas Kilbride, in a 2010 campaign to retain his seat that was the nation's most expensive of that type in a quarter- century.

Still, if a legal challenge to the newly passed pension-reform law reaches the high court, it will be decided by seven justices, six of whom have accepted campaign contributions from one or both sides of the debate: labor unions, business groups or a political fund operated by House Speaker Michael Madigan.

Madigan, a powerful Chicago Democrat, said last month the initiative could not have passed without his ability to persuade members of the House. A number of business groups said they support the law, while public employee unions oppose it, saying it violates a part of the state constitution.

"Even the most honorable justice has to acknowledge this looks bad. It puts them in a bad light," David Yepsen, director of the Paul Simon Public Policy Institute at Southern Illinois University, told the newspaper.

The Illinois Constitution calls for the election of judges and, in the case of Supreme Court justices, retention campaigns after each 10-year term. Elections cost money.

There is no legal limit on campaign contributions to judges, but the Judicial Code of Conduct prohibits them from personally soliciting or accepting contributions - a task left to campaign committees.

"Politics plays no role in any of the issues that we have before us," Chief Justice Rita Garman said in a December interview with Chicago Lawyer magazine. …

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