Egyptian Court Suspends Presidential Election

By Kirkpatrick, David D | International Herald Tribune, May 11, 2012 | Go to article overview

Egyptian Court Suspends Presidential Election


Kirkpatrick, David D, International Herald Tribune


Legal experts said that the ruling was expected to have little effect, and the candidates continued their campaigns, including preparations for the first televised debate.

An administrative court has suspended the Egyptian presidential election, scheduled to start May 23, but legal experts said that the ruling was expected to have little effect, and the candidates continued their campaigns, including preparations for the first televised debate.

Egyptians expressed disbelief and derision in response to the ruling on Wednesday, which underscored the continuing lack of certainty about many details, including the final list of candidates and the job description of the president. The election is planned as the final step in the country's military-led transition from the government of the ousted president, Hosni Mubarak.

The administrative court sought to suspend the election mainly because of a procedural issue: It found that the date had wrongly been set by an independent electoral commission instead of by the governing generals themselves. Adding to the complexity is the belief of some officials that the administrative court itself lacked the authority to suspend the vote, although the technical details of jurisdiction over election rules are a matter of heated dispute.

Legal experts said Wednesday that they expected the election to proceed as scheduled because the military council running Egypt promised as recently as Wednesday to begin the voting May 23, and lawyers were expected to appeal the administrative court's decision to the Supreme Constitutional Court. …

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