In U.S. Race, Fund-Raising Crowds out Campaigning ; Obama and Romney Aim to Raise a Combined Total of at Least $750 Million

By Nicholas Confessore; Ashley Parker | International Herald Tribune, September 13, 2012 | Go to article overview

In U.S. Race, Fund-Raising Crowds out Campaigning ; Obama and Romney Aim to Raise a Combined Total of at Least $750 Million


Nicholas Confessore; Ashley Parker, International Herald Tribune


Say goodbye to the traditional autumn fund-raising slowdown. Instead, Barack Obama and Mitt Romney are committing to ambitious fund-raising schedules.

In the closing weeks of a closely fought presidential campaign, Mitt Romney will be mingling with wealthy Republican donors in Chicago, San Diego and San Francisco, hundreds of miles from the swing state voters who will make or break his White House bid.

President Barack Obama will be traveling to New York, where the rapper Jay-Z will host a $40,000-a-head fund-raiser for him next week, and Los Angeles, where he is scheduled to raise a glass with the moneyed in early October, just days before the second presidential debate.

Say goodbye to the traditional autumn fund-raising slowdown, when big-dollar bundlers could go back to their day jobs, major donors could put away their wallets and candidates could focus on shaking hands and kissing babies on the campaign trail. For the first time since the inception of public financing, each party's candidate is declining the money for the general election.

Instead, betting that they can raise and spend far more on their own, Mr. Obama and Mr. Romney are committing to ambitious fund- raising schedules that are eating into valuable campaign time, tangling their travel schedules and complicating their efforts to woo voters.

For Mr. Romney, the continued burden of fund-raising -- on top of the even more pressing concern of debate preparation -- appears to have limited his time on the campaign trail, even as Mr. Obama takes advantage of feel-good photo opportunities, like his bear hug by a Florida pizza parlor owner on Sunday.

The week before the Republican convention, Mr. Romney averaged about one campaign event a day, fewer than typical for a challenger. He appears likely to keep that pace this week after spending much of the Democratic convention focused on debate practice.

Both Mr. Romney and Mr. Obama are hoping to have raised more than three-quarters of a billion dollars by Election Day, a target that will require each to raise well over $100 million in September and in October. Officials in both campaigns say they expect to be prospecting through Election Day, putting enormous demands on both the bundlers who gather large checks and the grass-roots donors who the officials believe will perk up as the campaign intensifies.

Mr. Obama, who led Mr. Romney in early fund-raising but was forced to spend tens of millions of dollars on advertising this summer to counter an onslaught of attacks from conservative "super PACs," is now redoubling his efforts to raise money, scheduling an extra round of high-dollar events in states like New York and California that have sent his biggest bundlers scrambling.

For Mr. Romney, that means deploying allies like Senator Marco Rubio of Florida, Governor Chris Christie of New Jersey and his own five sons to fund-raisers that Mr. Romney himself might have attended in the past, exploiting their star power to clear his time for debate preparations and speaking with voters.

Both candidates are also adapting their fund-raising schedules to accommodate the geographical demands of the campaign trail. …

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