Arts Guide

By Hopkins, Elisabeth | International Herald Tribune, February 2, 2013 | Go to article overview

Arts Guide


Hopkins, Elisabeth, International Herald Tribune


A look at selected art exhibitions worldwide.

Moscow

Tatyana Faidysh: The Voice of the Dumb Generation Moscow Museum of Modern Art. Through Feb. 24.

Active and creative in the 1980s, Russian artists, including Ms. Faidysh, turned into a "silent generation" in the 1990s when they could not cope with the sudden changes in the arts scene. If in their works they did not have the strength of their elders or the audacious adaptability of the younger generation, they nonetheless influenced the development of Russian contemporary art. In the 1980s, Ms. Faidysh experimented with texture, design and light; in the 1990s, she explored beyond the conventional plane. The result is a mix of collage and painting, with objects integrated into colorful semi-abstract painted forms. The exhibition features about 60 works spanning the past two decades. www.mmoma.ru

Houston

The Progress of Love The Menil Collection. Through March 17.

A joint project with the Centre for Contemporary Art in Lagos and the Pulitzer Foundation for the Arts in St. Louis, Missouri, that explores the universal concept of love, in its diverse interpretations by African artists. The three exhibitions offer different approaches: The end of love and its aftermath (St. Louis, through April 20); love in its ephemeral dimension (Lagos, ended Jan. 27) and love as an ideal here, where the works of Yinka Shonibare, Mounir Fatmi and Kendell Geers, among others, reflect how language, media, traditions and the socio-economic and digital environment are effecting people's expectations about love. Above, Mr. Shonibare's recent work, "The Swing (after Fragonard)." www.menil.org

New Delhi

Homelands Indira Gandhi National Centre for the Arts. Through Feb. 14.

What does "home" mean in the 21st century? To organize her visual exploration of the theme, Latika Gupta, the Indian curator, has selected more than 80 works by 28 contemporary British artists that belong to the collection of the British Council. The works illustrate the concept of "hyphenated identities," (born here, living/working there) because of permeable frontiers and migration fluxes, and opposing concepts like belonging/alienation, history/ memory, and identity/loss. Mona Hatoum (video, installation), Suki Dhanda (photography), David Hockney (painting), Martin Parr (photography) and Zineb Sedira (photo, video, installation), among others, figure in the show. The works will travel to Kolkata, Mumbai and Bangalore. Below, "Camouflage Bayrakli Mosque, 200" by the Scottish artist Nathan Coley, who investigates the social aspects of architecture. www.ignca.nic.in

San Francisco

Girl with a Pearl Earring: Dutch Paintings From the Mauritshuis De Young Museum. Through June 2.

The first stop in the American tour of 35 paintings from The Hague. They are proof of artistic innovations in the Dutch Golden Age, when a new wealthy merchant class emerged to become sponsors of the arts. …

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