Move to Oust Australian Premier Fails on Party Vote ; Gillard Keeps Her Post after Her Predecessor Decides Not to Run

By Siegel, Matt | International Herald Tribune, March 22, 2013 | Go to article overview

Move to Oust Australian Premier Fails on Party Vote ; Gillard Keeps Her Post after Her Predecessor Decides Not to Run


Siegel, Matt, International Herald Tribune


Prime Minister Julia Gillard had accepted a public demand for a leadership ballot within her party, but her predecessor, who was expected to run against her, unexpectedly decided not to.

Prime Minister Julia Gillard of Australia on Thursday survived an attempt by a senior lawmaker within her own party to oust her from her job, after her predecessor, Kevin Rudd, whom she deposed in a 2010 party coup, unexpectedly declined to run against her.

Ms. Gillard had accepted a public demand for a leadership ballot put forward earlier in the day by Simon Crean, a cabinet minister and former leader of the governing Labor Party. Mr. Crean had said that the party, which has been languishing in the polls for months, could only hope to prevail in September elections by returning Mr. Rudd to office.

But Mr. Rudd declined to seek the leadership, citing an earlier promise not to do so unless he had overwhelming support within the party and the position was vacant. His decision shocked the political and media establishment, which had all but declared Mr. Rudd the winner despite his not having put his hand up for the position, and it raised more questions than it answered about his role in the day's developments.

"This is a difficult day for the Australian Labor party -- a difficult day for the Australian government, but I take my word seriously," Mr. Rudd said just before the vote, explaining why he would not challenge Ms. Gillard. "I've given that word, I gave it solemnly in that room after the last ballot, and I will adhere to that word today."

The vote was held as scheduled, and Ms. Gillard was re-elected unopposed. But the day of high political drama gave rise to serious questions about what impact the spectacle would have on Labor's ailing political fortunes, and on those of the deeply unpopular Ms. Gillard as she pushes ahead with her campaign.

Ms. Gillard, the first woman to become prime minister of Australia, has seen her poll ratings plummet since announcing in January that federal elections would be held in September. The unusually early announcement kicked off an election season that has already been bruising, and the latest move against her from within her own party is unlikely to help her brand.

She has led a tenuous minority government since her parliamentary majority was diminished in a disappointing 2010 election. Although she beat back a leadership challenge from Mr. Rudd early in 2012, she has since slid in the polls against Tony Abbott, the leader of the opposition Liberal-National coalition. Despite Mr. Rudd's insistence that he would not challenge Ms. Gillard again for the leadership, his supporters had been actively canvassing the party for votes should his name be put forward during a ballot like the one held Thursday.

Ms. Gillard is seen by many within the party as an ineffective campaigner who is unlikely to deliver a victory in the Sept. 14 elections. Supporters of Mr. Rudd, like Mr. Crean, had seemed confident earlier in the day.

"Something needs to be done to break this deadlock," Mr. Crean said at a hastily assembled news conference in the capital, Canberra. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Move to Oust Australian Premier Fails on Party Vote ; Gillard Keeps Her Post after Her Predecessor Decides Not to Run
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.