Arts Guide

By Hopkins, Elisabeth | International Herald Tribune, June 15, 2013 | Go to article overview

Arts Guide


Hopkins, Elisabeth, International Herald Tribune


A look at selected art exhibitions worldwide.

Baden-Baden, Germany

Emil Nolde: Die Pracht der Farben Museum Frieder Burda. Through Oct. 13.

"I love the music of colors," Nolde said. The German Expressionist (1867-1956) remained independent in his inspiration and technique from the German art movements he briefly belonged to. After 29 of his works were exhibited in the infamous Entartete Kunst exhibition in Munich in 1937, Nolde became a recluse, and once barred from painting, created hundreds of watercolors. About 75 vividly colored landscapes, ocean scenes, figure paintings, night life scenes and religious motifs in oil and watercolor figure in the show. Above, "Am Weintisch, 1911." www.museum-frieder-burda.de

New York

Le Corbusier: An Atlas of Modern Landscapes Museum of Modern Art. Through Sept. 23.

Better known as the architect, he was also famous as a painter under the name of Charles-Edouard Jeanneret. His talents did not stop there. Le Corbusier (1887-1965) was also a city planner, a writer and a photographer. The exhibition brings together a variety of landscapes (landscapes of found objects, domestic, urban and territorial landscapes) imagined in watercolors, sketches, photographs, architectural models and paintings. The show will travel to Barcelona and Madrid in 2014. www.moma.org

Fort Worth, Texas

Wari: Lords of the Ancient Andes Kimbell Art Museum. Through Sept. 8.

Opening Sunday: Ancestors of the Inca, the Wari civilization (600- 1000 A.D.) is considered as the first empire of ancient Peru. Its artistic achievements are illustrated by a selection of ceramics, mosaics, ornaments in precious metals, sculptures and textiles of intriguing complexity. Above, a 10.2-centimeter, or four-inch, figurine of a standing dignitary in wood, shell, stone and silver. www.kimbellart.org

Venice

Robert Motherwell: Early Collages Peggy Guggenheim Collection. Through Sept. 8.

Peggy Guggenheim's patronage and shows were crucial for Motherwell (1915-91) after he came across the papier colle technique. About 40 works, cut, torn and layered in the '40s and early '50s are in the display. First influenced by Surrealism, they became rooted in Abstract Expressionism. The exhibition will travel to the Guggenheim, New York. www.guggenheim-venice.it

Aichi, Japan

Masterpieces of French Paintings from the State Pushkin Museum of Fine Arts, Moscow Aichi Prefectural Museum of Art. Through June 23.

The show features French 17th- to 19th-century paintings on loan from the Moscow museum. They were acquired over the centuries by Catherine the Great, the founder of the Hermitage Museum in St. …

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