Lift on Campaign Contributions Welcomed by Lawmakers, Criticized by Public Interest Groups

News Sentinel, April 3, 2014 | Go to article overview

Lift on Campaign Contributions Welcomed by Lawmakers, Criticized by Public Interest Groups


WASHINGTON -- A Tennessee government watchdog group warned Wednesday the U.S. Supreme Court's decision to strike down overall campaign contribution limits would send a flood of money pouring into federal elections and would give wealthy donors far too much influence over the electoral process.

"All of those interests have a right to be represented, but we don't think it's appropriate for the degree of influence to be based on the amount of money," said Dick Williams, state chairman of Common Cause of Tennessee.

But a Memphis attorney who serves as general counsel for the Republican National Committee and helped prepare court briefs for the case argued the decision affirms the basic constitutional rights of free speech and freedom of association.

"The practical effect of this ruling is to strengthen the First Amendment rights of the American people and to strengthen the role of political parties, which I think is a positive development," said John Ryder, who also serves as Republican national committeeman from Tennessee.

In its most significant campaign finance ruling in years, the Supreme Court decided 5-4 on Wednesday to strike down Watergate-era restrictions on how much money an individual can contribute to all federal candidates, party committees and political-action committees for each two-year election cycle.

The ruling did not change the limits on how much donors can give to an individual candidate or party committee. Those limits are $2,600 per election to a candidate for president or Congress and $32,400 to a party committee.

But the decision did wipe away so-called "aggregate limits" -- the total amount that a donor can give to all federal candidates, party committees or PACs. Those overall limits currently total $123,200 per election cycle. Of that amount, up to $48,600 can be given to candidates and $74,600 to the parties or other political committees in 2013 and 2014.

The ruling comes just four years after the justices, in a case known as Citizens United, eliminated limits on independent spending by corporations and labor unions.

While the removal of overall spending limits will mean wealthy donors are now free to give to dozens of federal candidates, it probably will have no direct impact on contests for the Tennessee Legislature or other state races, such as governor, said Drew Rawlins, executive director of Tennessee's Bureau of Ethics and Campaign Finance. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Lift on Campaign Contributions Welcomed by Lawmakers, Criticized by Public Interest Groups
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.