No Headline - Letters15

News Sentinel, May 15, 2014 | Go to article overview

No Headline - Letters15


Sharon Underwood, Clinton

Low voter turnout an embarrassment

After working the primary this month, I am sad to say that I am embarrassed and ashamed at the number of voters who showed up. When I think of the countries that don't have that right and the number of lives that have been lost protecting our right to vote, it makes me sad that people have become apathetic towards our country and our privilege to vote.

We have problems -- big problems -- in Washington, but we're still the best the world has to offer. If you're not happy with what's going on, vote. If you want to make a difference, vote. If you don't like who's running, vote anyway. If you don't understand all the issues, read, ask questions, learn what you can, then vote. If you do nothing, then say nothing the next time you're unhappy with what's going on in your county, your city or your country. Keep it up and you just might lose your right and be forced to say nothing.

Franklin Greene, Tellico Village

Earth's big problem is people infestation

The global warming articles suddenly saturating the news media are absolutely false. Global warming is not a crisis. Rather, it is only a specific example of a far greater problem.

For the past 20,000 years, the surface of Earth has hosted the virus h. sapiens, itself an evolutionary descendant of the far earlier h. erectus. Throughout this time, h. sapiens has lived in harmony with the rest of Earth's life forms. However, in the past 5,000 years, it has suddenly gone viral, overwhelming the available nutritional and power sources it requires to thrive. Like other mindless forms of viral life, it nevertheless continues to blindly expand and to consume these resources without consideration of either sustainability or control of the resulting residues.

Hence, although global warming is an immediate problem, the true crisis is this mindless consumption, pollution and gross destruction of vital Earth resources by h. sapiens, which is in turn leading toward the wholesale destruction of not only itself but also other life species that must share those resources.

But all is not lost. Massive viral and bacterial infestations, such as the Black Death and the 1918 influenza pandemic, have occurred in the past. Their common fate is that once they had burned through the available host resources, they imploded and either vanished or regressed to minor status. Perhaps, given the brutal and unsympathetic rules imposed by nature, this is to be the fate of h. sapiens.

B.J. Paschal, Pigeon Forge

Support for Israel harms U.S. interests

With allies like Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in the Middle East, who needs enemies? His insistence on Arab states recognizing his country as a Jewish state is a non-starter for peace.

Could Secretary of State John Kerry have avoided this non- starter? Not while breathing.

Israel, supposedly our No. 1 ally, certainly before that of God, has proved to be perfidious, driving the violence in the occupied territories in the West Bank and Gaza for its own cynical, hegemonic reasons. …

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