Horse Power Drove Britain's War Effort ; with Steven Spielberg's Film War Horse Drawing in the Crowds, STEPHEN BADSEY (Right), Professor of Conflict Studies at the University of Wolverhampton, Author of the Book Doctrine and Reform in the British Cavalry 1880-1918 and the Country's Foremost Historian of the British Cavalry in the First World War, Gives an Expert View on the Subject

By Badsey, Stephen | Birmingham Evening Mail (England), January 17, 2012 | Go to article overview

Horse Power Drove Britain's War Effort ; with Steven Spielberg's Film War Horse Drawing in the Crowds, STEPHEN BADSEY (Right), Professor of Conflict Studies at the University of Wolverhampton, Author of the Book Doctrine and Reform in the British Cavalry 1880-1918 and the Country's Foremost Historian of the British Cavalry in the First World War, Gives an Expert View on the Subject


Badsey, Stephen, Birmingham Evening Mail (England)


AT THE height of the First World War the British Army had well over a million soldiers under arms on the Western Front; but it also had nearly half a million horses.

In 1914-1918, the British shipped across the English Channel a greater tonnage of horse fodder than ammunition. Without horses, the war could simply never have been fought.

When people hear the word 'warhorse' they think of cavalry and magnificent mounted charges.

At its strongest the British cavalry on the Western Front numbered about 19,000 troopers and horses, plus cavalry units from India, Canada, and throughout the Empire.

Cavalrymen often shared an emotional bond of trust with their horses, facing death and danger together.

But the vast majority of the British Army's horses on the Western Front were used for transport, to pull or carry everything that the army needed to fight: every kind of horse from big Clydesdales to small ponies and mules.

The Army had a pre-war register of horses, and impressed some by compulsory purchase in 1914, but chiefly it just bought its horses: about 450,000 from Britain and Ireland, and over 700,000 more from all around the world, mainly from North America.

On the Western Front an effi-cient veterinary organisation meant that over two thirds of all sick or injured horses were returned to service. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Horse Power Drove Britain's War Effort ; with Steven Spielberg's Film War Horse Drawing in the Crowds, STEPHEN BADSEY (Right), Professor of Conflict Studies at the University of Wolverhampton, Author of the Book Doctrine and Reform in the British Cavalry 1880-1918 and the Country's Foremost Historian of the British Cavalry in the First World War, Gives an Expert View on the Subject
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.