Checking in on Obama's Same-Sex Marriage 'Evolution'

By Black, Eric | MinnPost.com, May 9, 2012 | Go to article overview

Checking in on Obama's Same-Sex Marriage 'Evolution'


Black, Eric, MinnPost.com


There's something annoying and a tad obnoxious about President Obama's "evolving" non-position on same-sex marriage. Later today, he may clarify.

In 2008, candidate Obama ran as someone who favored civil unions but not marriage for gays and lesbians. During his term he has done done away with the U.S. military's way-too-cute Don't-Ask-Don't- Tell policy on gay soldiers and he announced at one point that his views on full marriage rights were "evolving."

If you think about the word "evolving," it suggests that he is on his way to crossing the rubicon to full support. But after a while, leaving yourself in "evolving" status seems like a dodge. Since this is an election, Americans are entitled to know what his policy will be if he wins a second term.

And, since this is an election year and since support for gay marriage varies widely on a state-by-state and voting-bloc-by- voting-bloc basis, it's impossible to take the politics out of any presidential/candidate-ential utterances on the topic.

For example, North Carolina -- a swing state that Obama carried in 2008 and one of the nine states where Obama has begun advertising -- voted just yesterday by an overwhelming 61-39 percent to embed a same-sex marriage ban in the state Constitution. The Washington Post notes that about one in six of the top "bundlers" for Obama (those are key fund-raisers who bundle together a lot of contributions) are gay.

As you have probably heard (because everyone's been talking about it this week), Vice President Joe Biden said on "Meet the Press" Sunday that he is "absolutely comfortable" with full equality for same-sex couples. …

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