Swan Day Event Celebrates Female Creativity

By Riely, Kaitlynn | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA), March 15, 2012 | Go to article overview

Swan Day Event Celebrates Female Creativity


Riely, Kaitlynn, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)


As Tressa Glover traveled around Pennsylvania, interviewing dozens of women and asking them about their lives and their thoughts, she was searching for inspiration.

The quest was not just for herself. Ms. Glover, the producing artistic director for the No Name Players theater company, filmed the conversations with women ranging in age from 20 to 70, then compiled them on a DVD and sent the recording to female choreographers, playwrights and many other artists in Pittsburgh.

Her request: Use the women as muses to create original pieces of art.

The result will be on display tonight and Friday night, when artists in genres ranging across music, dance, poetry, theater performance art and fashion come together in a two-hour show at the New Hazlett Theater on the North Side.

"There really is something for everybody," Ms. Glover said.

The occasion is the annual Support Women Artists Now Day, also known as SWAN Day.

SWAN Day started five years ago as a way celebrate female artists and help them network so they can increase their visibility and opportunities. More than 700 SWAN Day events have been held in 21 countries since the program began, said Martha Richards, one of the founders of SWAN Day and the executive director of WomenArts, an arts service organization based in San Francisco. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Swan Day Event Celebrates Female Creativity
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.