Labor's Next Big Battle? Job Security Could Be the Next Front in Improving the Workplace

By Wilson, Rand | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA), July 15, 2012 | Go to article overview

Labor's Next Big Battle? Job Security Could Be the Next Front in Improving the Workplace


Wilson, Rand, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)


When the next opportunity for labor law reform arrives, union membership will be smaller and our political clout even more diminished. If we are to succeed, future reform proposals must be wrapped in a broader mantle that will appeal to all workers.

The four-year drive for the Employee Free Choice Act was the single largest union-backed campaign in decades and it succeeded in uniting the labor movement as never before. I doubt there was a steward in the country who wasn't familiar with EFCA and why we needed it.

The proposed law, which so many members fought for between 2006 and 2010, would have made it faster and easier for workers to gain union recognition through card check, created stiffer penalties for employers who violate labor laws and helped workers win difficult first contracts through binding arbitration.

Many union leaders believed EFCA to be labor's last opportunity to address the obstacles to recruiting new members and a rebirth of the labor movement.

While campaigning for EFCA was easy among union members, once we ventured beyond our ranks it was a much harder sell.

With faith in democracy deeply ingrained in the national psyche, it was almost impossible to convince the general public that card check was as democratic as a secret-ballot election. Every time the opposition yelled, "Union bosses want to take away your right to vote," we were put on the defensive and our allies floundered.

So while EFCA appealed to union members and a small population of workers who imagined they might one day like to join a union, it appeared to the public as a narrow "special-interest" labor bill.

The demise of EFCA closely resembled the fate of other reform bills backed by the labor movement: one against permanent striker replacement (1993); a plan for speedier elections, greater union access during organizing drives and relief for illegally fired workers (1978); and repeal of Taft-Hartley (1966), where we could not stop a filibuster in the Senate.

Past reforms led by the labor movement have won minimum wages, health and safety regulations, child labor laws and prohibitions against discrimination. And whenever the labor movement was on the offensive fighting for all workers, union membership grew.

What's left to achieve that might inspire all workers -- union and non-union alike?

"Employment security" could be the remaining frontier. A campaign to pass state laws requiring "just cause" before a worker is fired could also spur union growth, since one of the top reasons workers are afraid of organizing is the knowledge they are likely to be terminated.

Our existing laws have not diminished workers' fears because the procedures are too uncertain and lengthy (two to three years at the Labor Board and another two years in the courts) to provide any assurance. …

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