The Year in Art a Look Back at Memorable Exhibitions of 2012

By Thomas, Mary | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA), December 26, 2012 | Go to article overview

The Year in Art a Look Back at Memorable Exhibitions of 2012


Thomas, Mary, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)


Reflecting upon the variety and numbers of venues, shows and exhibitors in our region, it occurred to me that the Post-Gazette could have a "best of" category for arts institutions. However, for 2012 I'll stay with an overview of the year's exhibitions.

These 10 exhibitions enriched my year with new ideas, provoking commentary, explorations of culture, poetic beauty or a combination thereof. Some continue into the new year, and the catalogs for many of them offer a great read during holiday down time.

1 -- "Inventing the Modern World: Decorative Arts at the World's Fairs, 1851-1939" at Carnegie Museum of Art is as spectacular in its own way as the fairs themselves were, brimming with 200 unique objects that reflect the period's emphasis on craftsmanship and participants proclivity to shine. An outstanding symposium complemented the exhibition scholarship. (Continuing through Feb. 24; 412-622-3131 or www.cmoa.org.)

2 -- "Factory Direct: Pittsburgh," organized by The Andy Warhol Museum and exhibited at the museum and at Guardian Self-Storage, Strip District, featured work by 14 international and local artists produced in residency at local companies. The project result was more than the sum of its parts, generating innovative work but also camaraderie and good will among the artists and between artists and employees at participating sites.

3 -- "White Cube, Green Maze: New Art Landscapes" in the Heinz Architectural Center, Carnegie Museum of Art, is curator Raymund Ryan's thoughtful look at new directions museums and other cultural sites are exploring through examples in the United States, Mexico, Brazil, Germany, Italy and Japan. Vibrant images of each by noted architectural photographer Iwan Baan transport the viewer. You'll be planning your next six vacations after spending some time in this engaging and very progressive presentation. (Continuing through Jan. 13; 412-622-3131 or www.cmoa.org).

4 -- Deborah Kass: Before and Happily Ever After, a mid-career retrospective comprising 75 works at The Andy Warhol Museum, is an extraordinary compilation that does justice to its subject, a tall order when that's an artist as compelling, saucy and wise as this New Yorker, whose voice speaks truth and should reverberate beyond the museum walls. (Continuing through Jan. 6; 412-237-8300 or www.warhol.org.)

5 -- "Impressions of Interiors: Gilded Age Paintings by Walter Gay" at the Frick Art & Historical Center takes visitors into the homes of the privileged through intricate works painted during a period when the wealthy commissioned artists to represent their houses and grounds. Mr. Gay, however, was not a mere hired hand but a socialite himself who with his heiress wife lived in high style as expatriates in France. The Frick organized this exhibition with great care, including a presentation by a knowledgeable panel that gave context to the artworks and artist. …

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