NATION [Derived Headline]

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA), March 21, 2013 | Go to article overview

NATION [Derived Headline]


MINING, ENERGY WORKERS NEEDED

MORGANTOWN, W.Va. -- The United States isn't producing enough qualified workers to meet the future needs of the mining and energy sectors, from coal digging and gas drilling to solar and wind power, a new report says.

The report released today by the National Research Council urges new partnerships to tackle the problem of retiring Baby Boomers who cannot readily be replaced. That includes a retooling of higher education to produce more young people competent in science, technology, engineering and math.

The report predicts a "bright present and future" for energy and mining jobs, with continuing demand for workers and good pay for those who are hired.

But it says some industries already face labor shortages and others soon will because the nation's colleges and universities aren't cranking out graduates with the skills that growing companies need.

HOME SALES RISE

WASHINGTON -- U.S. sales of previously occupied homes rose in February to their fastest pace in more than three years, and more people put their homes on the market. The increases suggest a growing number of Americans believe the housing recovery will strengthen.

The National Association of Realtors said today that sales increased 0.8 percent in February from January to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 4.98 million. That was the fastest sales pace since November 2009, when a temporary home buyer tax credit had boosted sales. The February sales pace was also 10.2 percent higher than the same month a year ago.

YOUTUBE CLAIMS BILLION VISITS A MONTH

LOS ANGELES -- YouTube says more than 1 billion people are now visiting its online video site each month to watch everything from zany clips of cute kittens to sobering scenes of social unrest around the world. …

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