Munch Goes to Gaucho

By Siebert, Annie | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA), March 21, 2013 | Go to article overview

Munch Goes to Gaucho


Siebert, Annie, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)


When we first walked out of the cold, rainy mid-March day and into Gaucho, a new restaurant in the Strip District serving Argentine fare from a wood-fired grill, the smoke caught in our throats.

The small restaurant -- there are no tables, just three counters and one stool where diners can stand and eat -- smelled like a campfire. Firewood was stacked underneath the counters, and it was warm in the small, orange-walled restaurant despite the open front door.

Once you got used to it, the smoky scent wasn't overwhelming -- it poured onto Penn Avenue, likely drawing tipsy St. Patrick's Day revelers -- and the food from those fires turned out to be the perfect remedy to a cold day at the end of winter.

My husband, a pescetarian, was not deterred by the meat-heavy menu. We started with seasoned red potatoes called Gaucho papas ($2) and provoletta -- grilled, aged provolone with oregano, thyme, olive oil and lemon ($7).

The potatoes were good, but the provolone was inspired: Crispy slabs of provolone flecked with herbs were served atop thick, crusty bread and a side of arugula and olives with a lemon dressing. My husband, always complaining that food is under-crisped, was pleased with the crunchy bread and cheese.

Meat is the centerpiece of the menu -- five cuts of beef are offered in quarter-pound and half-pound servings, along with chicken and fish. I went with a quarter-pound of entragna -- skirt steak ($10) -- and my pescetarian partner opted for the day's special fish sandwich ($10), which was grilled salmon with greens and caramelized onions on ciabatta. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Munch Goes to Gaucho
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.