BANDY'S UNBORING BOARDS [Corrected 03/22/13]

By Phillip, Virginia | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA), March 21, 2013 | Go to article overview

BANDY'S UNBORING BOARDS [Corrected 03/22/13]


Phillip, Virginia, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)


Christopher Bandy, ballet dancer turned woodworker, has foodies at the Farmers Market Cooperative of East Liberty hovering over his one-of-a-kind cutting boards, made from salvaged urban wood.

The beautifully finished boards, in odd and fascinating shapes, do great things for hunks of cheese displayed at the market's PAMade Cheese counter. From there market-goers are drawn to the Bandy Woodworks stand at the opposite end of the market to see -- and touch -- a collection priced from $29 to $60, with many in the $35 to $40 range.

In addition to the earthy asymmetrical shapes, Mr. Bandy makes elegant "end-grain" boards in geometric mosaic patterns. These are rectangles and squares, the result of a laboriously repeated series of cutting, drying and gluing steps. They are then sanded until all surfaces are "as smooth as glass." End grain boards can be custom- ordered, to size and with options such as juice trough or rubber feet.

The salvaged honey locust wood, all from Point State Park root- rotted trees, felled by the city of Pittsburgh, has a story of its own. When Mr. Bandy started his woodworking business, the Homewood space he eventually found to share belonged "by pure coincidence" to woodworker Jason Boone.

Mr. Boone had been apprentice to wood artist John Metzler of Urban Tree Forge, creator of the dramatic free-form slab tables commissioned by Phipps Conservatory for the G-20 dinner with President Obama in 2009. …

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BANDY'S UNBORING BOARDS [Corrected 03/22/13]
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