Carolyn Miles

By Sheridan, Patricia | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA), March 25, 2013 | Go to article overview

Carolyn Miles


Sheridan, Patricia, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)


She was the first woman named to head the international charity Save the Children, but Carolyn Miles began her career in the private sector. While living overseas and working for American Express, she realized she wanted to do more to help those in need, particularly children. Ms. Miles began working for Save the Children in 1998 and was named CEO and president in 2011. She grew up in Bethel Park and now lives in Fairfield, Conn., with her husband and three children, ages 20, 17 and 11. She has traveled extensively to Save the Children's field operations around the globe. Follow Ms. Miles at www.twitter.com/carolynsaves.

Why leave a lucrative career in the private sector for the nonprofit world?

For me the defining moment was when I lived in Asia. At that time I had two of my kids, and we were traveling all over Asia. The thing that really struck me was the huge difference between the opportunities my kids would have and the opportunities the poor kids would have. The kids born into poor families really had so few opportunities. I started thinking: Was there something different I could do with my business skills?

So when we came back from Hong Kong to the United States, I started looking at nonprofit opportunities. Nonprofits are big organizations, and they need those business skills. I was lucky enough to get a job with Save the Children. I really wanted to do something to make a difference for kids. We have many people that come out of the business sector. It's big with 15,000 people and $1.6 billion in revenues. You need people who know how to run a complicated organization.

Because your own children were young when you got into this, did it change how you treated them, such as restricting material things?

The most important thing was I took them out to see the work we do. I took my son when he was about 14 to Ethiopia for a week to visit all the schools Save the Children supports to meet the kids. He did some fundraising before we left so he was able to buy them soccer balls and school supplies and things like that. What was most important for my kids, who were growing up in a very well-to-do part of the country, was to see that the vast majority of kids don't live that way. It was a great opportunity. We also went to Kenya as a family ... and we went to India a year ago with two of my children and visited some of the programs in the slums of Delhi.

Have you noticed if it has made a difference to them?

I think it has made a difference. A lot of kids are traveling these days and have seen a lot more of the world than I saw growing up, but I do think it does change their perspective.

I read on your site that one in five children in the United States lives in poverty. So how do you identify those children and save them?

The work we do in the U.S. is very much with schools, and we go to the poorest communities and work with the schools on key programs. One is literacy. There are millions of children in the U.S. who can't read by the time they get to the fourth grade. To be successful, you have to start early. So we have moved into preschool. We are running Head Start programs now.

Do you have permanent Save the Children sites in high poverty zones?

We don't build sites. We take on working with a school or existing center. On the international side, we do build schools.

So after you build a school overseas, do you remain there or give them to the community?

We give them to the community, absolutely. The actual physical labor is done by the community. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Carolyn Miles
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.