To Golf like Fred Couples, What a Dream

By Rotstein, Gary | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA), June 28, 2013 | Go to article overview

To Golf like Fred Couples, What a Dream


Rotstein, Gary, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)


Dear Fred Couples:

I see that you, one of the finest golfers of your generation (and mine, since we're about the same age, though for some inexplicable reason you look 15 years younger) are in town this week for the Constellation Senior Players Championship at Fox Chapel Golf Club.

I just wanted to wish you luck and encourage you to stop by to chat if you have time. (Like, if you have more rain delays and don't know what to do with yourself if you already took the Just Ducky tour last year.)

We have a lot in common, since we both like to spend time on the links and we both had bogeys when we played golf last Sunday. True, your bogey was your worst hole of the day and mine was my best, but that's just nitpicking. The key is that we both love the game -- or at least I did before officially announcing my retirement to my companions in the parking lot afterward.

I don't know how many times you've officially retired from playing golf, but this would be about No. 20 for me, or maybe it's No. 30. I lose track, similar to how I sometimes lose count of my number of shots on the course.

What was the last straw this time? Oh, I don't know, maybe the two balls hit directly into tree trunks back to back? (I could swear those trees were not present before I swung, thus defying all laws of either physics or optometry, which seems to occur a surprising amount.) Or maybe it's when a surprisingly on-target chip shot headed toward the flag stick struck another player's ball on the edge of the green, sending his closer toward the hole while mine rolled in reverse back down a slope.

I won't bore you with further details, as I know there's nothing duller than a person talking about his golf round. Although there was this one 3-iron you should have seen on No. 8 that -- oh, wait, I said I'd shut up.

But here's the thing I'd really love to discuss with you over an IC Light Mango or two while you're here: not the game itself, so much as the attitude toward the game. After all, Golf Digest magazine just named you the "coolest" golfer of all time.

You are so relaxed in every facet -- your swing, your stride, your reaction to your shots. …

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