Forging Ahead Resident Artist at Urban Tree Branches out While Continuing Its Work of Turning Reclaimed Wood into Furniture

By Gray, Lizabeth | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA), May 4, 2013 | Go to article overview

Forging Ahead Resident Artist at Urban Tree Branches out While Continuing Its Work of Turning Reclaimed Wood into Furniture


Gray, Lizabeth, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)


Three years ago, a visionary project called the Urban Tree Forge almost toppled with the death of founder John Metzler. It could have disappeared altogether if not for others who shared his passion for the trees of Pittsburgh.

Today, artist Jason Boone carries on that vision at Urban Tree (www.pittsburghurban-tree.com), a new name and a new location in Homewood that honors the old forge.

"It's been a lifelong dream to have a workshop, bring in the wood on one side and the furniture comes out the other," said Mr. Boone.

Like many life passions, Mr. Boone's love of woodworking started at an early age, on a farm near Kansas City, Mo.

"My parents were brave enough to allow me to have a fair amount of tools in the garage," he said, laughing. A young entrepreneur, he would buy pattern books, go around town getting orders and return later with the finished piece.

Trained as an architect, Mr. Boone moved to Pittsburgh in 2006 to work with the firm of Bohlin Cywinski Jackson. Yet his hobby remained a central part of his life. After running out of room in his apartment kitchen to do the kind of woodworking projects he wanted, he started working as a resident artist at the Urban Tree Forge.

He said the direction of his life changed the day Metzler died in 2010.

"He passed away May 13, and he had a bunch of jobs waiting to be finished," said Mr. Boone. "I jumped in and helped finish up. Then in July, I got laid off from the architectural firm."

Mr. Boone's dream remained with the forge and so did he. However, many of the other artists drifted away.

"I started up my own company, buying out pieces of the Urban Tree Forge, even some of the wood," he said.

Last July, he made the move from the old location on Washington Boulevard in Lincoln-Lemington to the new one on Susquehanna Street in Homewood. It still functions as a cooperative, with five businesses sharing the space.

Mr. Boone's dream of a "full-cycle" workshop came closer with the building of a drying kiln, a key component in creating quality furniture.

"It was a big investment. ... I either needed to build it or buy a truck to haul the stuff back and forth," he said.

Important to Mr. Boone's vision is keeping everything local; building the kiln was an obvious step. "I source things here and do everything here. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Forging Ahead Resident Artist at Urban Tree Branches out While Continuing Its Work of Turning Reclaimed Wood into Furniture
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.