Volunteer Efforts Spruce Up Resumes

By Niederberger, Mary | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA), February 13, 2014 | Go to article overview

Volunteer Efforts Spruce Up Resumes


Niederberger, Mary, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)


University of Pittsburgh students Raeesa Islam and Jacky Chen recently spent a morning visiting residents of the UPMC Heritage Place nursing and rehabilitation center in Squirrel Hill.

Although their primary goal was to spend the day donating their time to the community as part of Pitt student outreach, both Ms. Islam, 18,a freshman, and Mr. Chen, 19, a sophomore, know that an added bonus is the fact that volunteer work will look good on their resumes for employment or graduate school. Both are hoping to go to medical school.

"Community service is a highly valued component to student resumes," said Cheryl Finlay, director of Pitt's Office of Career Development & Placement Assistance.

How students spend time outside of the classroom can be almost as important as how they spend their time inside the classroom when it comes to job prospects.

While university placement officials make it clear that academic success should be the first priority for college students, having the right soft skills and activities to list on a resume is a close second.

"I think we are in a period where good grades are imperative, but not necessarily enough," said David Wasieleski, chair of the management department in the Palumbo-Donahue School of Business at Duquesne University.

Some clubs and activities are better than others in terms of helping students to learn the soft skills employers are seeking.

Those skills, according to a survey by the National Association of Colleges and Employers, are: the ability to work in a team; ability to make decisions and problem solve; ability to obtain and process information; ability to plan, organize and prioritize work; and ability to communicate verbally.

In addition, university officials said, leadership qualities are highly valued among prospective employers.

Topping the list of preferred clubs and organizations are student chapters of professional organizations associated with students' majors.

"These types of organizations connect students to real experiences that can benefit them and connect them to professionals who are working in their fields," said Shari Payne, dean of engaged learning at Robert Morris University. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Volunteer Efforts Spruce Up Resumes
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.