Students Bring History Alive for the Weekend

By Barcousky, Len | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA), March 2, 2014 | Go to article overview

Students Bring History Alive for the Weekend


Barcousky, Len, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette (Pittsburgh, PA)


Just portraying Abraham Lincoln would appear to be a big challenge for 12-year-old Erin Mahoney.

The sixth-grader at Sewickley Academy raised the stakes on Saturday by also bringing to life assassin John Wilkes Booth and Dr. Samuel Mudd. She was one of almost 400 students who are taking part this weekend in National History Day at the Heinz History Center.

Participants from 27 school districts in southwestern Pennsylvania are presenting papers on historical topics, setting up exhibits, producing documentaries, launching websites and performing as important figures and everyday people from the past.

Middle school students competed on Saturday for a chance to go on to the History Day state contest in May at Millersville University. High school students will present the results of their projects for the same opportunity today at the history center.

In preparation for her presentation on Lincoln's assassination, Erin and her parents, Dolores and John Mahoney of Franklin Park, visited some of the actual sites that figure in the story. They included Ford's Theater in Washington, D.C., where Lincoln was shot; the Surratt house and tavern, where a plot was hatched to kidnap Lincoln; and the home of Mudd, who cared for Booth after he broke his leg. Booth injured himself when he leaped from Lincoln's box after shooting the president. Mudd's house and the Surratt homestead are both in Maryland.

She estimated that she had spent about 300 hours, including travel time, preparing for her presentation.

Mudd's role in the aftermath of Lincoln's murder remains controversial. He was convicted of being part of the conspiracy and jailed for several years in a military prison off the coast of Florida.

Family members have claimed for a century and half that their ancestor did not recognize the man he was treating as Lincoln's killer. Booth, however, had met Mudd at least twice and had stayed overnight with him at his farm.

"He lied about certain things," Erin said of Mudd. "He seems kind of guilty."

Erin and other presenters were making use of visual aids to tell their stories. Her props included an old-fashioned doctor's bag, a journal similar to the one Booth wrote in and a copy of the "wanted" poster with photos of suspects in the presidential assassination. She also wore different facial hair for each of the characters she portrayed.

Addie Best, her face smudged with dirt, portrayed a French fishwife. The 12-year-old home-schooler from Confluence said her character was part of the working-class mob of women. The women were angry over rising bread prices and shortages, and they forced King Louis XVI, Marie Antoinette and their son to leave their palace at Versailles and return to Paris during the early stages of the French Revolution. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Students Bring History Alive for the Weekend
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.