EDUCATION - TEACHING THE TEACHERS - Earning How Best to Teach Youngest

By Jordan, Jennifer D | Providence Journal (Providence, RI), October 16, 2012 | Go to article overview

EDUCATION - TEACHING THE TEACHERS - Earning How Best to Teach Youngest


Jordan, Jennifer D, Providence Journal (Providence, RI)


PROVIDENCE - Marie Van Velzer has taught preschool for a quarter- century, helping 3-, 4- and 5-year-olds learn through play, investigation and hands-on activities.

It wasn't until this fall, however, that Van Velzer, 53, understood how to include master paintings in her daily art classes. Now she can help her students grasp the contrast of color and the flow of lines because she has learned about the principles and elements of design in a college course, "Methods and Materials in Art Education."

"I'd always wanted to use real artists' work with my children and I didn't know how," said Van Velzer, who is displaying a copy of Van Gogh's "Starry Night" in her classroom at East Bay Community Action Head Start in Newport. Each child emulates the dark background of the master work by using dark construction paper and then painting it with watercolors.

"It's amazing what they're doing," Van Velzer said.

Van Velzer is one of 19 early childhood educators who are receiving specialized training in their field through scholarships paid for as part of Rhode Island's $50-million federal Early Learning Challenge Grant.

The goal of the scholarship program is to help childcare providers and preschool teachers who have associate's degrees to take additional classes at Rhode Island College and potentially earn bachelor's degrees. Without the scholarship, such training would be out of reach, Van Velzer says.

The scholarships pay 90 percent of the teachers' course and book expenses, and some associated costs that have been identified as barriers. These include transportation stipends, $600 bonuses and up to 108 hours of "release" time from their jobs. The scholarships help cover the costs of substitutes so the teachers can study.

The scholarships amount to about $6,500 per person for five courses, according to Ready to Learn Providence, an early childhood organization that is overseeing the scholarship program.

Long a marginalized area of education, from birth to age 5 is now widely believed to be among the most critical periods for children's growth and learning. Nationally, there is pressure to strengthen the early education profession through improved training for teachers and to expand access to high-quality programs, particularly for low- income children.

"To really address the achievement gap between racial and social groups, you have to provide quality preschool, because it's more difficult to address those gaps once children enter kindergarten," said Alexander "Sasha" Sidorkin, dean of RIC's School of Education and Human Development.

Many low-income children enter kindergarten with vocabulary deficits that make it hard to catch up to their middle-class peers, for example.

"The argument has been made for years that these are actually the most important years in a child's development," Sidorkin said, "and in a perfect world, the most qualified educators would be working with them. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

EDUCATION - TEACHING THE TEACHERS - Earning How Best to Teach Youngest
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.