Franklin Exhibit Heralds Founder's Varied Work

By Guerrero, Aaron | Roll Call, February 9, 2012 | Go to article overview

Franklin Exhibit Heralds Founder's Varied Work


Guerrero, Aaron, Roll Call


Benjamin Franklin died a decade before the nation's capital moved to the swamps along the Potomac River. This week, he makes a grand entrance.

"Benjamin Franklin: In Search of a Better World," which opens Friday in the Lawrence F. O'Brien Gallery of the National Archives, is a midwinter gift for American history junkies.

Older, more worldly and with broader life experiences than many of the Founding Fathers, Franklin was "a man of amazing talents who not only helped shape the Declaration and the Constitution, but whose influence we still feel today in many other ways," Deputy Archivist of the United States Debra Wall said at the exhibit's unveiling earlier this week.

The project is a joint venture between the Foundation for the National Archives and the General Motors Foundation, with the foundation donating $100,000 to bring it to fruition. The Benjamin Franklin Tercentenary and the Minnesota Historical Society organized and designed the project.

Before coming to the District, the exhibit made stops in Pennsylvania, Michigan, Minnesota and France, a testament to the global reach Franklin still holds more than two centuries after his death.

The National Archives Experience will give the exhibition its own flavor through rare encased documents, including:

- The Treaty of Paris, which ended the American Revolutionary War in 1783.

- A 1777 letter from Franklin to the Continental Congress, updating the body on his diplomatic efforts at the French Court as a member of the Committee of Secret Correspondence.

- A journal of the Constitutional Convention, detailing Franklin's involvement in the compromise over Congressional representation. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Franklin Exhibit Heralds Founder's Varied Work
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.