A Foot in the Door ; Rep. William Lacy Clay Learned the Legislative Ropes as Assistant Doorman

By Guerrero, Aaron | Roll Call, March 13, 2012 | Go to article overview

A Foot in the Door ; Rep. William Lacy Clay Learned the Legislative Ropes as Assistant Doorman


Guerrero, Aaron, Roll Call


Rep. William Lacy Clay spent 17 years in the Missouri state Legislature. In 2000, he was elected to the U.S. House, following in the footsteps of his father, Bill Clay, a fellow Democrat who had represented the same district for more than three decades.

But the roots of Clay's political experiences do not rest simply in bearing witness to his father's career. He gained an invaluable political education as an assistant doorman in the Office of the Doorkeeper from 1978 to 1983.

As a student at the University of Maryland, Clay squandered the "dad scholarship" that he received by getting placed on academic probation after his freshman year.

Short on cash and eager to turn himself around academically, he followed his father's instruction by picking up a full-time job in order to continue his studies. He worked by day, studied by night.

Courtesy of an appointment from former Rep. James Symington (D- Mo.) -- the son of a former Senator -- Clay went to work in the House documents room, where he stayed for two years before joining a group of about 50 others as an assistant doorman.

The new role required learning the names, faces and home state of every Member of Congress, a task helped by a picture book. Other aspects of the position included delivering messages and security work. But the central task was opening doors for Members making their way to the floor of the House.

"Our main function was to open the doors when there was a vote, announce the vote and be sure that it was the Member that was going through the door," Clay told Roll Call.

In his first year on the job, Clay worked the doors near the House Gallery. But after a security breach, he was placed at the floor level, where he spent his final four years on the job.

Being closer to the floor had considerable perks. Clay earned higher pay. He came to work decked out in a suit and tie. And he met luminaries of all social stripes.

"You have Senators, presidents. I met a pope, kings and queens. I even had the occasion to meet Brooke Shields when she was a teenage star," he said.

The experience not only allowed Clay to interact with Members on a regular basis, but it also exposed him to the legislative process in a more intimate way, prompting him to think about his long-term career aspirations. …

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