Give Young Adults Needed Privacy for Health

By Denise Chrysler; Robyn Rontal | Roll Call, March 15, 2012 | Go to article overview

Give Young Adults Needed Privacy for Health


Denise Chrysler; Robyn Rontal, Roll Call


Under the 2010 health care overhaul, millions of young adults in the United States can access health care on a parent's health insurance policy. That's a good thing because it means they are more likely to get preventive care that can keep them from getting sick in the first place.

Yet a glitch in the system means that young adults might forgo treatment for conditions they don't want their parents to know about -- such as sexually transmitted diseases.

These young people are afraid, and rightly so, that an insurance company will send an explanation of benefits home to the parent who holds the health insurance policy. And that means Mom or Dad will know about the services they received at the doctor's office.

Research suggests that young adults ages 19 to 26 will skip a visit to the doctor if they are worried about privacy. In the worst- case scenario, that translates to no treatment at all or delayed care for sexually transmitted diseases, mental health problems, substance abuse, domestic violence, unplanned pregnancies and many other serious and potentially costly conditions.

EOBs do serve an important function. These letters document receipt of health care services, listing specific information such as the type of care, the patient's name, the provider, total payment made and the date of service. They're required by law in most states, because they notify the patient about services received and encourage them to report errors or fraudulent billing to the insurer -- and in this way, they save money for our health care system.

At the same time, this glitch in the system can negatively affect an individual's health. For example, if a young woman doesn't want her parents to know about an unplanned pregnancy, she might delay getting the prenatal care that helps lead to a healthy pregnancy and a full-term baby. If a young man with serious depression doesn't get treatment, he might end up losing a job, or worse.

And if we consider the effect that this privacy glitch could have on the spread of STDs, it is easy to see this problem as a public health issue.

Chlamydia is the most common STD in the United States, causing more than a million reported cases of infection every year. Yet health plan data shows that chlamydia screening has remained below the 50 percent mark since 2000. …

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