Outside Groups Spent Big on Congressional Travel

By Becker, Amanda | Roll Call, January 14, 2013 | Go to article overview

Outside Groups Spent Big on Congressional Travel


Becker, Amanda, Roll Call


Outside groups spent more than $3.6 million last year to send members of Congress and staffers on trips to far-flung locations such as Indonesia, Israel, Ghana and Turkey, a figure that could increase as late filers submit their post-travel disclosure forms.

Though the sum spent in 2012 was less than the nearly $6 million laid out the year before, it still marked a high point for election- year travel since Congress tightened its restrictions on trips sponsored by outside groups in 2007.

Year-end tallies by the website LegiStorm show that privately sponsored travel drops during election years, when lawmakers spend more time on the campaign trail, and surges during odd-numbered years.

Ken Boehm of the National Legal and Policy Center, a nonprofit that promotes ethics, says there are "overt' and "covert' reasons that organizations sponsor congressional travel.

The trips can be valuable opportunities for lawmakers and their staffs to get out into the field at no added cost to taxpayers. But they can also give special interests a chance to influence legislation and policy, a prospect that led Congress to amend travel rules in 2007 as part of a larger effort to curb the influence of lobbyists.

The restrictions capped most trips funded by entities that employ lobbyists at one day, though exceptions were written into the reforms for nonprofit groups, colleges and universities. Organizations that do not lobby but are closely linked to those that do are not barred from sponsoring travel.

"Congressmen are frequently accused of living inside a bubble. So you can make a good case that members should be traveling and getting to see certain things overseas,' Boehm said.

"But all too often they have been arranged by groups that have very pronounced legislative interests,' he added. "And what"s more enticing than having the possibility of talking [to lawmakers] in a relaxed, vacation resort-type setting?'

The American Israel Education Foundation spent more than $650,000 last year - more than any other group - to send more than 60 lawmakers and staffers to Israel for tours of Jerusalem, seminars on Israeli politics and discussions of asymmetric warfare, according to congressional travel filings.

The foundation"s main purpose is to fund these "educational seminars to Israel for members of Congress and other political influentials,' according to its mission statement, which was emailed to CQ Roll Call by a representative from the American Israel Public Affairs Committee, its affiliated lobbying organization.

The nonprofit Aspen Institute spent nearly $500,000 on trips last year, according to records kept by LegiStorm. …

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