Issa Irked by Postal Service Decision to Maintain 6-Day Delivery

By Phenicie, Carolyn | Roll Call, April 10, 2013 | Go to article overview

Issa Irked by Postal Service Decision to Maintain 6-Day Delivery


Phenicie, Carolyn, Roll Call


The Postal Service's decision to put on hold its plan to restrict regular mail delivery to five days a week has drawn the ire of a congressional overseer.

House Oversight and Government Reform Chairman Darrell Issa, R- Calif., said the move undercuts the credibility of postal officials who told Congress they were prepared to make difficult cuts despite political pressure.

"It's quite clear that special interest lobbying and intense political pressure played a much greater role in the Postal Service's change of heart than any real or perceived barrier to implementing what had been announced," Issa said in a statement.

But some congressional Democrats and members of both parties who represent rural districts praised the latest Postal Service move.

Postal officials announced in February they would end Saturday delivery of letters and magazines beginning the week of Aug. 5 in order to save about $2 billion annually. Postmaster General Patrick R. Donahoe said in February that language in the stopgap funding law that expired March 27 (PL 112-175) did not bind the Postal Service to six-day-a-week letter delivery. The Government Accountability Office, however, issued an opinion on March 21 that the provision still applies.

"I am gratified that the USPS has suspended its ill-advised plan to end Saturday delivery, which was in contravention to an explicit prohibition on such a move passed repeatedly by Congress in the appropriations process," said Rep. …

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