5 Animated Short Films Get Oscar Nominations

By Lloyd, Christopher | Sarasota Herald Tribune, February 16, 2012 | Go to article overview

5 Animated Short Films Get Oscar Nominations


Lloyd, Christopher, Sarasota Herald Tribune


"DIMANCHE/SUNDAY" (10 min.) -- In Patrick Doyon's elegiac little tone poem, a small boy in a tiny town must endure the various constructions of grown-ups designed (in his mind) to torment him: uncomfortable clothes, boring church, gross fish dinners and, most dominantly, the speeding trains that rush by the village constantly, shaking the walls and rattling nerves. He places a Canadian coin in the tracks to flatten it, resulting in a somewhat scary flight of fancy involving a bear. Doyon employs a minimalist animation style - - I adored the people's stretched noses, and the fat little crows who act as a sort of Greek chorus. (3 stars out of four)

"THE FANTASTIC FLYING BOOKS OF MR. MORRIS LESSMORE" (15 min.) -- Oh, what a tidy treasure. This slick-looking but soulful piece of computer animation draws inspiration from "The Wizard of Oz," Buster Keaton and a trove of literary references. A man watches as the wind blows away the letters in the book he is writing in, then turns into a hurricane that transports him into a magical land where books fly and communicate. He becomes their caretaker/librarian, and finds a new life that he understands very little, but which gives him meaning. I loved the various small touches, like a Humpty Dumpty book becoming his best friend, flipping its illustrated pages to show emotion, and the subtle transitions from color to black-and- white. (4 stars)

"LA LUNA" (7 min.) -- There's no Pixar film represented in the animated feature category this year -- a first -- but the computer animation wizards still have an Oscar nominee among the short films. …

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