Chef Bobby Flay Offers Recipe for Success to Owners of California Chrome

By Girardot, Frank C | Pasadena Star-News, July 15, 2014 | Go to article overview

Chef Bobby Flay Offers Recipe for Success to Owners of California Chrome


Girardot, Frank C, Pasadena Star-News


Unfolding like a bad fifth season of "Honey Boo-Boo" or "Pawn Stars", the feel-good California Chrome story suddenly has become ugly, loathsome and weird.

So weird and so ugly in fact that on Sunday celebrity chef Bobby Flay, who should have been mentoring America's next Food Network Star about the proper use of squid ink, instead offered some sage advice on the use of printer's ink.

All because the folks involved with California Chrome do some pretty wacky and unusual stuff.

Like this latest move: Chrome's owners decided to skip the annual Pacific Classic at Del Mar. They wanted an unheard of $50,000 appearance fee to bring their horse.

At least Del Mar told them to get lost.

Sadly, the only losers are the fans who love the very special horse and his very special trainer and won't get a chance to show their appreciation to him or his owners, who call themselves Dumb Ass Partners.

Flay, a horse owner himself, is part of that same fan base that admired California Chrome for his grit this spring. Like the rest of us Flay saw him win the Kentucky Derby and Preakness and cried when he came up short in the Belmont.

Now, Flay rightly hopes to rescue the three-year-old from a train wreck of bad publicity perpetrated by head Dumb Asses Steve Coburn and Perry Martin, who seem to have no clue about decorum and behavior. I liken these two to Al Czervik, Rodney Dangerfield's boorish character in "Caddyshack." Except they have come to life without an ounce of humor.

In retrospect, the frosting came off the cake after Chrome lost Belmont, the third leg of the nearly impossible Triple Crown quest. If you know nothing about horse racing, but a little about Flay's Food Network, it's like losing on "Chopped", only there's more money at stake.

Flay, in the stands behind the Dumb Ass team at Belmont, watched as the antics from Coburn and Martin began to curdle and give racing fans indigestion.

"We were all hoping that you'd be part of history," Flay admonished the partners in a post on the Paulick Report. …

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