Maybe Cities Can Take Lead on Gun Violence

By Vestal, Shawn | The Spokesman-Review (Spokane, WA), July 12, 2014 | Go to article overview

Maybe Cities Can Take Lead on Gun Violence


Vestal, Shawn, The Spokesman-Review (Spokane, WA)


Among the many ways in which gun extremists are holding the country hostage is the 18-year blackout on federal funding for research into gun violence.

But if Congress can't take the most reasonable, the most sane, the most obvious of baby steps - merely studying gun violence, say, or closing the gaping gun show loophole - then maybe there's another source of sanity out there.

City councils.

The Seattle City Council recently commissioned a University of Washington study of King County hospitalizations for gun injuries - finding that those with gunshot injuries are much more likely to suffer further gunshot in the future and more likely to be arrested later for a violent crime. Meanwhile, representatives of Spokane's City Council are talking with state officials about crafting agreements that would allow the state to join an expanded national database of violent crimes, to help improve the nationwide tracking of the causes and circumstances of violence.

Research into gun violence plummeted after a 1996 law passed Congress outlawing any studies that might "advocate" for gun control. The law followed, more or less directly, a study that found that gun ownership was associated with a higher risk of homicide in the home, a conclusion the National Rifle Association did not appreciate.

In practice, this has meant all federally funded research evaporated - apparently, knowledge is an end-run violation of the Second Amendment. Since then, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has had an annual budget of zero to study the 30,000- plus gun deaths annually in America. President Obama ordered the CDC to resume firearms research last year, but the law remains in place and a lot of questions remain.

To put this into perspective: We spend $2 million a year studying falls among the elderly, which killed 21,700 people in 2010. We spend $10.6 million studying Lyme disease, which killed 22,014 people in 2010.

The Seattle City Council-commissioned study was limited, for sure - tracking 222 people who were hospitalized in King County for firearms injuries in 2006-07. Through 2012, those people were 30 times more likely than those hospitalized for other reasons to be injured with a firearm again; they were also more likely to later be arrested for a violent crime themselves. The data don't offer a simple solution - there is no simple solution, of course - but researchers and City Council members said it could suggest a population and a place where some combination of creative, preventive efforts might be targeted.

Meanwhile, Spokane's City Council is in discussions with the state Department of Health over seeking grant funding to join the National Violent Death Reporting System. The NVDRS is a standardized assembly of the causes and consequences of violence in America, and it is a perfectly suitable example of the ignorance under which we proceed when it comes to guns: Just 18 states are a part of it now, and 11 more are to be added. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Maybe Cities Can Take Lead on Gun Violence
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.