Blawg: Web Log Highlights Light Side of Intellectual Property Law

By Price, Marie | THE JOURNAL RECORD, January 4, 2007 | Go to article overview

Blawg: Web Log Highlights Light Side of Intellectual Property Law


Price, Marie, THE JOURNAL RECORD


From "patent trolls" to the legal tussle over which city gets to call itself "Surf City USA," it's all fair fodder for PHOSITA, the award-winning law blog operated by members of an Oklahoma City law firm.

"What we wanted to do was not be a stuffy law newsletter or anything like that, but have a little bit more fun, and kind of use it to give a face to the types of people that work in our firm," said Doug Sorocco, a director and shareholder of Dunlap, Codding and Rogers.

Sorocco said those in the legal blogosphere tend to have a good sense of humor.

"The people who do it are usually a little irreverent, so it's kind of fun," he said.

About that name: In order to be patentable, an invention must not be obvious to a "person having ordinary skill in the art" (PHOSITA), or the field in which a person seeks to patent a particular invention.

Launched in January 2004, the PHOSITA blawg (law blog) was recently recognized as Best Group Blog by Lawyers in a Law Firm by Blawg Review. Last year, it was named Best Law Blog by Business Blogging Awards.

"I've been told that we're like the People Magazine of legal blogs," Sorocco said. "We want to provide information to folks. Yet we don't want to be just a tech newsletter or a legal newsletter, where it's this new rule or that new rule."

There are plenty of people who do those, he added.

"The things we have found from our readership is that they enjoy some of the intellectual property oddities that we pull up, or the weird things," Sorocco said.

Weird things?

Sorocco said an example of the latter might be choosing a trademark that means something obscene in a foreign language.

Then there is the protracted legal battle between the California cities of Huntington Beach and Santa Cruz over the right to use the term "Surf City USA" as a trademark - no, seriously.

"It's been very successful," Sorocco said of PHOSITA, which he said averages 20,000 to 25,000 contacts per week, including actual hits, e-mail viewers and those who subscribe to its RSS feed.

Sorocco said in blogging, "The concept is being involved in the conversation."

Operating a blawg has enabled Sorocco and the firm to network with many more colleagues and clients, and make more friends, than they could achieve through in-person contacts at conferences, meetings and the like.

"I meet everyone from the CEO of a Fortune 100 company down to an individual inventor in Hawaii," he said. "You never know who's going to e-mail you or ask you a question. And you just kind of keep that conversation going. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Blawg: Web Log Highlights Light Side of Intellectual Property Law
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.