Speak Up during National Bullying Prevention Month

St. Joseph News-Press, September 8, 2014 | Go to article overview

Speak Up during National Bullying Prevention Month


(StatePoint) With classes, sports, homework and other activities, weekdays are action packed for kids. Unfortunately, some students deal with an unwelcome addition to their daily routine -- bullying. An estimated 13 million students are bullied annually, according to government statistics.

With online social media so widely available to kids today, bullying doesn't necessarily stop after school, and often takes place round-the-clock. The repercussions can be missed days of school, depression and even suicide.

Fortunately, kids are getting more help these days as bullying prevention efforts are growing nationwide.

Cartoon Network has been a pioneer in this space and its "Stop Bullying: Speak Up" campaign has been empowering bystanders to put a stop to bullying since it launched in 2010. On average, more than 100,000 people visit the initiative's website monthly to learn prevention strategies.

"Speaking up to a trusted adult is the safest, most effective way for victims and bystanders to bring an end to a bullying situation," says Alice Cahn, Cartoon Network vice president of social responsibility. "Bystanders in particular can be powerful agents for change when they report incidents."

Support for Cartoon Network's award-winning pro-social effort has come from such diverse organizations as Facebook, Boys & Girls Clubs of America, LG Mobile, and CNN. President Obama even invited Cartoon Network to the first Bullying Prevention Summit at the White House, and later introduced the initiative's first documentary, "Speak Up."

This year, Cartoon Network's Speak Up Week (Sept. 29 - Oct. 3) kicks off National Bullying Prevention Month in October and is a great time to review ways that adults and kids can stand up to bullying:

* Cyberbullying: Don't contribute to the problem by sharing, saving, forwarding or reposting information. …

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