Legal Notice - EDUCATION SERVICES FOR CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES

The Roanoke Times (Roanoke, VA), September 19, 2014 | Go to article overview

Legal Notice - EDUCATION SERVICES FOR CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES


EDUCATION SERVICES FOR CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES

The public school divisions are committed to providing a Free Appropriate Public Education (FAPE) to all children found eligible for special education services from ages two through twenty-one (inclusive). Each public school division also has the responsibility to identify, through the Child Find process, children residing in this jurisdiction, who qualify for special education and related services. According to the Virginia Department of Education, students may be found eligible for services in compliance with the regulations who meet the criteria for the following disabilities:

Autism- means a developmental disability significantly affecting verbal and nonverbal communication and social interaction, generally evident before age three that adversely affects a child's educational performance. Other characteristics often associated with autism are engagement in repetitive activities and stereotyped movements.

Deafness- means a hearing impairment that is so severe that the child is impaired in processing linguistic information through hearing, with or without amplification that adversely affects the child's educational performance. Deaf-Blindness- means hearing and visual impairments occurring at the same time, the combination of which causes such severe communication and other developmental and educational needs that they cannot be accommodated in special education programs solely for children with deafness or children with blindness. Developmental Delay- means a disability affecting a child, ages two through eight, who is experiencing developmental delays as measured by appropriate diagnostic instruments and procedures, in one or more of the following areas: physical development, cognitive development, communication development, social or emotional development and/or adaptive development. Emotional Disability- means a condition exhibiting one or more of the following characteristics over a long period of time and to a marked degree, that adversely affects educational performance: an inability to learn that cannot be explained by intellectual, sensory or health factors; an inability to build or maintain satisfactory interpersonal relationships with peers and teachers; inappropriate types of behavior or feelings under normal circumstances; a general pervasive mood of happiness or depression or a tendency to develop physical symptoms or fears associated with personal or school problems. Hearing Impairments- means impairment in hearing, whether permanent or fluctuating, that adversely affects a child's educational performance but is not included under the definition of deafness in this section. Intellectual Disability -means significantly sub average general intellectual functioning existing concurrently with deficits in adaptive behavior and manifested during the developmental period that adversely affects a child's educational performance. Learning Disabilities- means a disorder in one or more of the basic psychological processes involved in understanding or in using language, spoken or written, that may manifest itself in an imperfect ability to listen, think, speak, read, write or do mathematical calculations. The term includes such conditions as perceptual disabilities, brain injury, minimal brain dysfunction, dyslexia, and developmental aphasia. The term does not include learning problems that are primarily the result of visual, hearing or motor disabilities, of mental retardation; or emotional disturbance; or of environmental, cultural, or economic disadvantage. …

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Legal Notice - EDUCATION SERVICES FOR CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES
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