Letters to the Editor

Wyoming Tribune-Eagle (Cheyenne, WY), October 8, 2014 | Go to article overview

Letters to the Editor


Headline xxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxx xxxxx From A. Donn Kesselheim Lander To the participants of the gubernatorial debates: Wyoming's current - and surely temporary - prosperity in terms of state revenues is the result of our eager willingness to profit from the sale of fossil fuels, e.g. coal, oil, natural gas, coal-bed methane. (We lead all 50 U.S. states in the production of coal.) Consequently, our state is responsible, directly or indirectly, for greenhouse gas emissions - carbon dioxide, most significantly - compared to those of many nations. Some have described Wyoming as, "the emissions epicenter for the Earth." Yet in the face of incontrovertible evidence that there is a positive correlation between global average temperature increase and CO2 emissions produced by human activities, there are climate change deniers/ lawmakers from our state in both Cheyenne and Washington.

When we read about the experience of residents of California who are experiencing the worst drought in that state's history, we should focus upon our connection with this event. When we anticipate the consequences of shutting down the Gulf Stream - when (not if) that occurs - we should focus upon our responsibility for this occurrence.

What do you understand to be Wyoming's role in global climate change? I wish to refer you to an article titled, "Cooking the Climate with Coal," from the May 2006 issue of Natural History Magazine. I don't think it contains information that you do not already have. Yet because it is such an excellent summary of what has been happening - indeed, since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution - in our state/country/world, I hope you will find time to look at it.

Wyoming has not been a leader in modeling the shift from fossil fuels to renewable energy sources. Why is that.

Headline xxxxxxxxx xxxxxxxxxxx xxxxx From Father Jason Dickey Cheyenne After our "Call to Prayer for Religious Freedom" on Sept. 28 at our State Capital, on a social media site a parishioner apologized for making a comment: "WY to go!" Given that she meant to say "Way to go," she apologized. She shouldn't apologize. First of all, we live in Wyoming. And second of all, the entire concept of the event was to promote equality. After all, we do live in the "Equality State." It was wonderful, and it warmed my heart to have my fellow Orthodox clergymen attend the event along with His Grace Bishop Etienne from the Catholic Diocese of Cheyenne and other faithful from the Orthodox, Catholic and other religious communities in our state who support those who are suffering from violence in the Middle East and elsewhere in the world. Yet given that we live in the "Equality State," it would have been nice to have a few of our leaders from Wyoming attend the event. The only politician who attended was Stephan Pappas, who is running for State Senate. Thanks, Stephan.

Like I said in my interview, if one member of the body suffers, the entire body suffers. Saint Paul said this to the people of Corinth quite some time ago. His message is still relevant today, especially if we act on our awareness and love for those who are suffering across the world. …

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