Specialty Hospital for Brain Injuries Opens in Tulsa

By Davis, KirLee | THE JOURNAL RECORD, March 1, 2007 | Go to article overview

Specialty Hospital for Brain Injuries Opens in Tulsa


Davis, KirLee, THE JOURNAL RECORD


NeuroRestorative Specialty Centers has opened what it calls the state's first licensed specialty hospital dedicated to post-acute brain injury treatment.

The North Little Rock, Ark., firm said the 18-bed Tulsa facility, called Oklahoma NeuroSpecialty, will serve as a regional treatment center for the Sooner State and neighboring areas.

It serves a small but growing market.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates about 1.5 million U.S. residents sustain traumatic brain injuries each year. John Sassin, chief executive of Comprehensive Community Rehab Services in Tulsa, expects those numbers to rise as more war veterans return to civilian life.

"This has been getting a lot more attention," he said, even as treatment options gradually declined in the general hospital community. "Their population has been growing immensely, and we expect it to continue to grow immensely over the next few years."

Whether mild or severe, such injuries require specialized treatment involving both a variety of therapy levels as well as community-based non-medical services, according to the National Institutes of Health Consensus Panel on Rehabilitation of Persons with Traumatic Brain Injury.

Under Medical Director Perri Craven, board certified in physical medicine and rehabilitation, Oklahoma NeuroSpecialty provides comprehensive rehab and behavioral services. Its clinical team ranges from speech language pathology, neuropsychology and behavioral analysis to physical and occupational therapy, social work and case management. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Specialty Hospital for Brain Injuries Opens in Tulsa
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.