Obama's Economic Propaganda Has a Limited Shelf Life

By Limbaugh, David | Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The, November 4, 2014 | Go to article overview

Obama's Economic Propaganda Has a Limited Shelf Life


Limbaugh, David, Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The


Democrats have continued to stoke their phony "war on women" issue and racial politics this election cycle because it's all they've got. President Obama's domestic policy and foreign policy are in shambles, and they know it.

In the most recent two national elections (2010, 2012), Democrats used the race and gender cards, to be sure, but they talked up the economy and healthcare more than they're doing now. They completely distorted those issues, but today they must have discovered that their propaganda just won't prevail against the brutal realities people are experiencing.

Some pundits have suggested that Democrats, given the grim outlook that faces them in the elections, are regretting the fact that they didn't talk about new economic proposals instead of putting most of their eggs in the identity politics basket.

But there would have been a major downside to their adopting that strategy. It would have shone a bright light on failed policies they've wholeheartedly supported for the past six years. If your party has been in power, you can't propose a whole new set of solutions without conceding that yours have failed.

Democrats rarely, if ever, admit that their policies haven't worked, and Obama never admits it. They either sanitize the record or blame Republicans. In fact, to listen to Obama tell the story, you would assume we're in a period of robust growth. He'll tout the fall in the nominal unemployment numbers without ever acknowledging that the labor participation rate is the lowest it's been since the 1970s. People say numbers don't lie, but the unemployment numbers alone do. Unfortunately for Obama, unemployed people know they don't have jobs.

The same is true with healthcare. Obama can spin it however he wants to, but people know that their premiums are going up, that they're losing their plans and doctors, that the White House has been dishonest about all aspects of Obamacare and that the administration has made a colossal mess of rolling it out and administering it. It's one thing for Obama to entice people with grandiose promises. It's another for him to convince them that he has fulfilled already-broken promises.

Putting aside the disastrous mess Obama has made of foreign policy and the war on terror, just look at what is happening with the economy. Personal spending has been falling instead of rising; child poverty is at the highest point it's been in two decades; the so-called "job vacancy rate," according to Harvard economics professor Greg Mankiw, is back to the pre-crisis level; and even a recent relatively optimistic report on the gross domestic product may have been misleading because of a statistical error in Obama's favor. …

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