Building on the Past

By -, megan gloss | Telegraph - Herald (Dubuque), November 13, 2014 | Go to article overview

Building on the Past


-, megan gloss, Telegraph - Herald (Dubuque)


if you go Event: "Greek Architects of Istanbul in the Era of Western Civilization" Times/dates: 2-4:30 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 23, opening reception and lecture; exhibit runs Monday, Nov. 17- Thursday, Dec. 11. Site: Quigley Art Gallery, Clarke University, 1550 Clarke Drive Cost: FreeOn the surface, it might not seem as if modern-day Dubuque has much in common with the historic Greek architects of Istanbul, Turkey.

But Mantea Schmid sees things quite differently.

"Istanbul is such a rich culture," Schmid said. "And, the people there have such a love and a pride for their community. It's a city of growth that treasures its great architecture. Dubuque can definitely identify with that."

Schmid is the driving force and local exhibit project coordinator behind "Greek Architects of Istanbul in the Era of Westernization," a photographic exhibit she's worked to bring to the Dubuque community. She also is the parish president of St. Elias the Prophet Church, in Dubuque.

St. Elias is partnering with the Greek Orthodox Metropolis of Chicago, Clarke University and Mediacom to present the exhibit, set for display at the Quigley Art Gallery on the Clarke campus, beginning on Monday, Nov. 17, with an opening reception and lecture planned on Sunday, Nov. 23.

The exhibit gallery talk will be presented by Dr. Bryan Zygmont, assistant professor of art history at Clarke. It's titled, "From Athens to Rome to Constantinople: The Classical Roots of Byzantine Architecture."

Constantinople was the capital of the Roman, Byzantine and Ottoman Empires. It was renamed Istanbul in 1923, after the establishment of the modern Republic of Turkey.

The exhibit will present boards filled with colorful photographs, including 104 buildings designed by 57 architects and featuring archival documents and drawings of buildings, with rare photographs of the Euro/Asian city of Istanbul.

The exhibit originated in Istanbul before being brought to the United States by Bishop Demetrios, chancellor of the Greek Orthodox Metropolis of Chicago and an expert on Byzantine and modern Turkish culture. It was displayed at the Turkish American Society, in Mount Prospect, Ill., as well as at Loyola University, in Chicago, in October and November 2013.

Schmid accompanied Demetrios to Istanbul to view the original exhibit and to see the real-life architecture.

Since then, it was her dream to bring the exhibit to Dubuque.

"After the exhibit closed at Loyola, the organizers had been looking for another space in the United States for it to be displayed," Schmid said. …

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