Top Medical Journal Published Gruber without Disclosing His Federal Funding

By Adams, Becket | Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The, November 19, 2014 | Go to article overview

Top Medical Journal Published Gruber without Disclosing His Federal Funding


Adams, Becket, Examiner (Washington, D.C.), The


An architect of the Affordable Care Act apparently failed to disclose his financial ties to the federal government on at least two submissions to the New England Journal of Medicine, one of the nation's most respected medical publications.

At the same time MIT professor Jonathan Gruber was under multiple contracts for consultation services to the federal government for healthcare reform, he submitted two articles, "Universal Health Insurance Coverage or Economic Relief -- A False Choice" and "A Win- Win Approach to Financing Health Care Reform," to the NEJM without disclosing the apparent conflict of interest.

The articles, the first published in January 2009 and the second published in June 2009, include a disclaimer at the end: "No potential conflict of interest relevant to this article was reported."

The NEJM website also includes an Oct. 8, 2009, video that features Gruber and others discussing the cost and economics of healthcare reform. No potential conflict of interest warning is included on the video page.

Gruber has received more than $2 million in contracts from the Department of Health and Human Services, according to the Washington Post. Separately, Gruber has been awarded top dollar contracts from individual states for his consultation services, including $481,050 from Michigan, $329,000 from Minnesota, $400,000 from Vermont and $400,000 from Wisconsin, according to the same report.

Federal contracts awarded to Gruber date back to at least 2007, the year that then-Sen. Barack Obama, D-Ill., assembled a campaign team for his 2008 presidential effort.

On Dec. 2, 2009, however, Gruber's submitted material to the NEJM began to appear with a notice of a potential conflict of interest. Gruber's work appears at least six more times on the NEJM website, each submission including the same warning.

At around the same time that Gruber was contracted by the federal government for his services on a project titled, "Choice and Consequences in the Medicare Part D Plan," the Center for Science in the Public Interest published a "white paper" on the topic of potential conflicts of interest. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Top Medical Journal Published Gruber without Disclosing His Federal Funding
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.