Secrets Abound in Charm City Streets

By Karlovits, Bob | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, November 29, 2014 | Go to article overview

Secrets Abound in Charm City Streets


Karlovits, Bob, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Baltimore is a city with plenty to do.

By itself, the Inner Harbor area offers great food and drink, the National Aquarium and the U.S.S. Constellation, the last sail-only warship built by the Navy.

Those items are only a start to a city with professional sports teams (yes, even the Ravens), a symphony orchestra and a few neighborhoods that alone are worth the trip.

But Baltimore also is a place with museums and galleries that are hosts to tempting tourist-ready events.

Some of the current ones are holiday-related, but the best are those that share some of Baltimore's secrets.

Ho, ho, Harbor

One of the biggest elements of the worldwide celebration of Christmas has returned to West Shore Park on Baltimore's Inner Harbor.

The German Christmas Market brings a touch of central Europe to town with 45 vendors and their arts and crafts in a heated tent near a huge holiday tree.

A Bavarian beer garden offers pretzels, bratwurst and gingerbread along with brews. There are daily concerts by choirs, bands and other performers with themed weekend events.

The market runs through Dec. 24. Weekdays are free.

For weekend events and admission: 443-760-0686 or baltimore- christmas.com

And, say, you can see

Baltimore is an appropriate place to have any kind of examination of the United States flag. After all, the Star-Spangled Banner got its name in one explosive night at Fort McHenry.

The Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History & Culture is looking at how people of all races and colors have had a role in making the flag a symbol of freedom. "For Whom It Stands" has more than 100 pieces of art, artifacts and documents showing the American experience with the flag.

It includes works by white, black, Arab- and Israeli-Americans among others and has a sound installation with many interpretations of the national anthem.

It runs through Feb. 28 and is included with admission, which is $8, $6 for seniors, students and ages 7 to 17, and free for those younger.

Details: 443-263-1800 or rflewismuseum.org

A-Mazing exploits

Mendes Cohen did it all. Or so it seems.

The Jewish Museum of Maryland tells the story of the exploits of the banker-philanthropist-adventurer who was part of the small Jewish population of Baltimore in the early 1800s.

"The A-Mazing Mendes Cohen" looks at his experiences in the city when the British were threatening Fort McHenry, at the Vatican for the installation of a pope and sailing down the Nile.

It does so in the form of a maze where visitors can make choices of directions they want to go, seeing exhibits of his various adventures.

It is open through June 14. Admission is $8, $6 for seniors, $4 for students and $3 for those under 12.

Details: 410-732-6400 or jewishmuseummd.org

A new way of thinking

America's founding fathers, dreamers, saints, inventors and scientists all share one part of their realities: the "a ha! …

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