DRUG COURTS ; Too Few Rural Drug Treatment Centers, Justice Says

By Kabler, Phil | The Charleston Gazette (Charleston, WV), January 20, 2015 | Go to article overview

DRUG COURTS ; Too Few Rural Drug Treatment Centers, Justice Says


Kabler, Phil, The Charleston Gazette (Charleston, WV)


Drug courts statewide could save the state $20 million a year in costs of incarcerating adult and juvenile drug offenders, but there aren't enough treatment programs available to make that work, particularly in rural parts of the state, state Supreme Court Chief Justice Margaret Workman told the Senate Finance Committee Monday. Under the Justice Reinvestment Act passed in 2013, drug courts are to be operating in all 55 counties by July 2016. However, Workman said the lack of inpatient and outpatient clinics, as well as substance abuse counselors in more rural parts of the state is making that goal difficult to achieve.

"We have people needing these drug rehabilitation services, and they're just not available, she said.

Currently, drug courts serve 35 counties, and about half of the Supreme Court's $5.9 million funding increase for the coming 2015- 16 budget year is to expand the courts into another five counties.

Workman said drug courts have proven successful, and cost about $7,100 per participant per year - a fraction of the $26,000 a year cost to house an individual in a state prison.

However, she said the challenge will be expanding into the remaining rural counties that are lacking in drug treatment programs and facilities.

"We are working as hard as we can to meet the goal the Legislature established to have drug courts throughout the state by the end of [fiscal] 2016, Workman said. "We are having a rough time finding the resources in parts of the state, and we hope that's something the Legislature will address.

Sen. Bill Laird, D-Fayette, a former county sheriff, said he's concerned about the disparity if it means that nonviolent drug offenders in more urban parts of the state have an opportunity to participate in the community sentencing option that drug courts offer, while the only option for offenders from rural areas is incarceration in prison. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

DRUG COURTS ; Too Few Rural Drug Treatment Centers, Justice Says
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.